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Where Did I Go Wrong?


Off He Goes

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Alright, I'm wiring up my Hagstrom HIIN today, and it didn't work. So I would love some help from you guys.

I'm only trying to get the humbucker sized P-90 in the neck posistion wired.

The guitar has 2 volume, 2 tone, and 3 way switch.

There are 2 wires coming from the pickup. I connected the hot wire (white) to the neck volume, connected in turn by a diode, to the tone pot. The bare ground wire, is connected to the back of the volume pot, as a ground. The switch is connected to the back of the volume pot, to the output jack, and to the pickup. Should there be another connection to the output jack, because there are two things there, and only one is used.

There is no sound at all when the guitar is plugged in, any ideas?

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OK...well I think you will need a diagram.

But lets get back to basics...

The pickup is simply a coil of wire...a humbucker two coils connected together...

So there are two wires...right...one connects to one side of the jack and the other to the pointy bit when it is plugged in. This is the pickup without any volume control. Now...the volume control is like a tap, the pot will allow some flow from the pickup to go between the hot and ground (bypassing the amp) and so is of less volume. The tone control is similar but the small capacitor allows treble frequencies to leak to ground leaving a bassy tone.

Now...what have we got here...

The guitar has 2 volume, 2 tone, and 3 way switch.

right...so effectively a Les Paul control system....

I'm only trying to get the humbucker sized P-90 in the neck posistion wired.

ummm...you mean you are swapping out the neck pickup for a new one...well you'd just wire it up where the last one went...no? Or do you mean that it is now a single pickup guitar???

There are 2 wires coming from the pickup.

correct....

I connected the hot wire (white) to the neck volume

fine...three connections there...got the right one?

connected in turn by a diode, to the tone pot

hmmm...I suspect you mean capacitor

The bare ground wire, is connected to the back of the volume pot, as a ground

good...now you have ground on the back of the volume pot

The switch is connected to the back of the volume pot, to the output jack, and to the pickup

ok...now you are loosing me a little...you have grounded all the components??? and the switch...if there is only one pickup, what does it do...or is there another pickup?

Should there be another connection to the output jack, because there are two things there, and only one is used

hmmm...well yes there should be a ground to one (the ring part connection) and a hot (the tip connection)

There is no sound at all when the guitar is plugged in, any ideas?

yes...there is only one wire going to the output probably. SO...there should be a ground connection and a hot connection, you said that you connected ground to the jack, that's one...so where has the hot gone???

pete

If you can, see if you can draw or explain it a little more. Do you have a diagram that you are following?

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Okay, so where does the hot wire come from? And does the ground just go from the lug to the back of the volume pot?

Most typically, the hot wire should come from your three way switch. Do you have a wire from each volume control going to the switch?

Yeah, I have the two wires going into the switch. One from each wire. There are four wirse on the switch. I thought two were grounds and the other two were for the volume pots.

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Okay Pete, I'm sort of using this diagram

http://www.guitarelectronics.com/product/WDUHH3T2202

Trying to use it anyway. It's a Les Paul diagram but mine is very similar setup.

There are two pickups, but I'm trying to take it slow, and not mess up anything. There are some wires from the original pickups, which were taken out before I got the guitar (a freebie.) So is it okay, to connect the hot pickup wires, to the original ones, or should I just get rid of those?

I'm still a little lost on the output jack. According to the diagram one of the wires from the switch goes to the jack, but where does the other wire on the jack come from?

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the other wire on the jack doesn't really "come" from any where, it goes to the ground (trem claw, bridge)

So I need a wire from the jack to the bridge? I'm not sure how thats going to work at all. My bridge is pegged, and redrill, so I can't imagine how to get a wire near it.

I have a strat style output jack, with two lugs. One has a rounded edge, while the other is more flat. Does it matter which one is connected to hot, and which to ground? If it does, how do I find out?

Edited by Off He Goes
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I have a strat style output jack, with two lugs. One has a rounded edge, while the other is more flat. Does it matter which one is connected to hot, and which to ground? If it does, how do I find out?

Plug a regular cord into the jack and look at how it connects to the prongs. The end of the cord, ie. the metal part that plugs into the output jack has a metal tip (hot) with a black ring (insulation) and a metal shaft (ground). So your hot wire is soldered to the lug that is connected to the part contacting the tip of the jack (HOT). The ground goes on the other lug.

If you are still unsure because you can't see how the thing works then use a multimeter to check for continuity. Plug a cord into the jack and , with meter set for resistance (ohms), touch the tip of the unplugged end of the jack and one of the lugs. A reading on the meter will tell you which one is hot. I find the meter is also useful for double checking switch positions.

Edited by Southpa
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Sorry...been a little distracted...here's that diagram, it may help others too...

wdu_hh3t22_02.jpg

Right...so you see that the electrical signal is generated by the pickups coil and magnetic field, it has to flow down the hot and back via the ground.

So on the jack plug on the above you will see a wire going from the pickups, via the controls (that taps some off to ground) to the selector (which connects one both or the other pickup "hots") then finally on to the jack "tip". So, the pickups are going to the jack tip. There is also on the jack a little arrow...this is labeled "sleeve" or the ring part of the jack and this arrow like symbol is the sign for ground. You will see that there is a ground symbol at various points, the pots, the selector, shields you have them and importantly the jack. (in the box to the left of the guitar there is an explanation of this symbol)

So all these points are connected to ground. It is better so as not to effectively make loops of wires which can act as noise ariels, to connect all of these to a single point...usually the back of the pots, but it could be a small screw or any central point.

Under the bridge pickup you will also see a wire to ground labeled bridge. This will ground the bridge and with it the strings. If the bridge and strings are not grounded you may (probably/will) get noise as your body will act as a ground point, or at least become a part of the circuit.

I'm still a little lost on the output jack. According to the diagram one of the wires from the switch goes to the jack, but where does the other wire on the jack come from?

Ok so...you see that the hot is connected....the ground is connected because all the grounds are connected together.

So I need a wire from the jack to the bridge? I'm not sure how thats going to work at all. My bridge is pegged, and redrill, so I can't imagine how to get a wire near it.

Umm...well yes, you do need to ground it. "pegged"...hmmm not sure what you mean, on a strat it is typically connected via the spring claw...if it is a tune-o-matic one of the studs through the body. If your bridge is screwed down (hard tail strat, say) then a bear wire under it that presses down to make contact is probably enough...coat it in solder if bear copper to avoid corrosion coating the wire in the future.

There was a thread recently on "grounding" that coverd this. If it is a stud tailpiece you may be able to run a thin wire to it via a hole drilled from the pickup cavity...you will find a way, and it is necessary.

Hope that all helps... pete

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