Jump to content

struggling with first coat


thekeen
 Share

Recommended Posts

Hi All,

I am new at guitar building. I decided to buy a cheap guitar kit to begin. I got the SAGA TC-10 (Telecaster clone).

I bought Krylon Acrylic lacquer paint (cherry red and clear for the clear coating).

Since I am new, I also tested on a piece of wood before spraying on the guitar. I was ok, until I sprayed the guitar.....

To make a long story short, I now have 3-4 runs :D. What is the best way to remove the runs before applying the second coat?

What grade sand paper do we use and do we dry-sand or wet-sand?

From the paint tutorial, it seems to be using something close to a 400 grit and wet sanding, but, I just want to double check.

Also, what am I loking for to know that I have finished sanding. Am I looking for a flush surface or not seeing any marks of having a run?

Thanks for answering me newbie questions.

Stephane.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

To make a long story short, I now have 3-4 runs :D.  What is the best way to remove the runs before applying the second coat?

What grade sand paper do we use and do we dry-sand or wet-sand?

From the paint tutorial, it seems to be using something close to a 400 grit and wet sanding, but, I just want to double check.

Also, what am I loking for to know that I have finished sanding.  Am I looking for a flush surface or not seeing any marks of having a run?

Yeah 400 grit would be plenty, just use a sanding block and sand it down till the run is all the way out.. you can usually tell by looking and by feeling for any bumps. You don't really have to use wet sandpaper at this stage.. mostly in the polishing stage. Also, since your going the aerosol can route.. your gonna need to spray more coats than if you was using a spray gun, since they go on paper thin layers. So as a good measure, spray 4-6 coats color basecoat, and 10-12 clearcoat, that way when you are finished and let it cure out, you can polish it with less stress, since you have a nice layer of paint, but you still have to be careful, you sure don't want to sand down to the sealer or primer.

Here are some tips to maybe help you paint better and eliminate runs.

1. Start by spraying off the guitar (ex. to the left) and make a steady swipe across the guitar body and only stop spraying after you spray past the body(to the right of it). Just an example, you'll can paint vertically and horitzontally, since you need to do both to keep streaks out.

2. Keep a nice steady even pace when painting.

3. Let the proper flash time go by before painting more coats.

4. When spraying you want to keep it straight and the next pass, aim to spray directly on the edge of the last pass, or basically just have the spray fan go over the last pass halfway.. in this way you'll be covering any missed areas and will have a nice non streaky finish.

When you have sprayed the last coat of clear. You'll have to let it cure for at least a week and up to a month.

After it has cured out, read LGM's polishing tutorial and you should be able to get a really great finish you'll be proud of. After you work with acrylic or nitro lacquer you'll want to throw it away and get some Polyurethane or Polyester and use it since it's alot more durable and easier to work with.. and buy a decent compressor spray gun.. and oh yeah.. make sure you wear a respirator no matter which paint you decide to use!!!

Good Luck

Matt

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If the guitar is a flat-top (as I suspect), lay it flat (horizontal) while you spray it. Spray it until you get a nice "wet" look, but not too much near the edge (RUN!).

If you insert some nails or screws in strategic places, you can lay the body on a bench nearly perfectly level but with the face (or back) of the guitar standing off from the table. Spray one side nice & wet, wait a little while (so the paint can set up so it won't run), flip it quickly and spray the other side nice & wet. If you get a few runs, they will be entirely on the sides of the guitar and can be sanded out realtively easily.

If you have belly or forearm contours, you need to be a little more careful about runs (=thickness of coat) than with a standard squared-off tele.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...