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What's More Crucial For The Fender(tele) Sound?!


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Pickups, not kidding. Most important of all. Second scale length. Then material and construction (bolt on, string through body etc)

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I have to agree with Mr. Swede. But I would say scale legth first, then pick-ups as even after market tele-type pups sound twangy too. I guess I would say pick ups first as long as they are tele-ish. Lip stick tubes sound pretty tele-ish in the neck pos of a strat, at least mine does.

R-

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For those of you saying the scale length makes a tele sound like a tele consider this, the tele has a 25.5" scale length. What do ya know TONS of guitars have the 25.5 scale length and none of them sound like a tele.

It's not in one thing alone. It's in the maple neck, the pickups, the scale length, the body wood, ant the construction (not in that perticular order)

If I had to say one thing it's most in it would deffinitly be the pickups. Stick a strat pickup in a tele and it sounds much more like a strat, reverse that and stick a tele pickup in a strat and it will bring it much more into the tele territory.

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It's not in one thing alone. It's in the maple neck, the pickups, the scale length, the body wood, ant the construction (not in that perticular order)

It's the bridge plate. Think about it...what's the big difference between a telecaster and every other guitar? Simple: it's the fact that the bridge pickup is set in metal, not wood.

The other parts add to it, sure, but as Godin points out, there are tons of guitars with maple necks, same scale length, same wood, pretty much the same construction, and some of them even use single coil pickups.

But they don't use that plate.

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I would think that the bridge itself is a just a solid mounting spot. It's still suspended by springs and a trio of screws. It's the windings and the polepieces that make it sound like a tele pickup.

I believe it's more the pickup itself than the bridge. Particularly since many bridges (including the originals) are made of brass, which is non-magnetic. You can have a tele with a brass bridge, and it'll still sound like a tele.

Greg

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In my mind, it has -always- been the bridge plate, and not just -any- bridge plate, but it has to be the cheap stamped steel Fender bridgeplates, not that machined Brass Gotoh stuff, no no no no no...that is the heart and soul of a Telecaster is that cheap $5.00 stamped steel bridgeplate, it sets the stage for -everything- else.

Pickups come next, very low impedance, nothing over 7k or so.

Maple neck next.

Then scale length.

My opinion only. :D

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Cool, I like cheap! So where you get them five dolla tele bridges? :D

fi' dolla for Fender...$15 for you...

I bought a Fender plate for my tele...it's not exactly the same metal as those cheapos (I have a couple from the Chinese tele copies I butchered). Different kind fo metal --and the Fender plate is magnetized. You'd figure that that would have an influence too.

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Actually, there's more I forgot to add.

Besides the cheap stamped plate, which adds the 'twang' factor, you have the three sets of saddles instead of 6 individual saddles which add a lot more downward pressure per saddle on that stamped plate, those two things acting together are generally touted on the Telecaster boards as the biggest influence on the typical Tele sound.

Having said that, you know that a lot of the hollows and semi-hollows from the 60's can sound an awful lot like a Tele, take the James Bond theme music, sounds a lot like a Tele, but was a semi-hollow or fully hollow guitar, FWIW.

It is also spoken of that the typical Tele sound is as much in your playing style as anything else.

If you don't know how to drive, the finest Mazzerati will just sit in the driveway and go nowhere. :D

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so if I go with a six saddle bridge and a hb sized p90 combined with a tele baritone scale not having a good hat.... what will I get?

is it right that the 3 saddle tele bridge is pretty dang hard to get a proper intonation from? and if one string breaks the other one is pretty F intonation wise?

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FWIW, there's a company (I'd have to do a search unless someone knows offhand) that makes a semi-intonatable 3-saddle aftermarket replacement.

Er, that was convoluted... let's try again:

There's a company that makes these saddles that fit "traditional" 3-saddle Tele bridges, but are actually somewhat staggerred where the strings 'break' over the saddles, meaning that they are semi-intonatable.

A picture would say a thousand words here, but I don't have the link handy. :D

Greg

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so if I go with a six saddle bridge and a hb sized p90 combined with a tele baritone scale not having a good hat.... what will I get?

is it right that the 3 saddle tele bridge is pretty dang hard to get a proper intonation from? and if one string breaks the other one is pretty F intonation wise?

A P90 and a long scale is gonna sound more like a Dano "tic-tac" bass or a Fender Bass VI, good hat or not. More than likely. If you want a Tele sound, play a Tele.
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