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Chemical Stripping.


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Your choice of stripper will depend upon the type of finish you are removing and the surface you are removing it from...in this case wood. The stripper should have a product index and/or website to reference htat should give you all the information you need to know. Research strippers and find which one applies to you. Sorry, I don't know them well enough to simply answer you question. In regard to your neck question...if you are stripping the back of the neck, mask off the binding and fretboard and you should be fine...most fret boards are attached with glues that require heat to remove. Of course, the more you can avoid contact between the solvent and the neck/fretboard joint the better.

Rog

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Thanx for the response!

I talked with the color-department at my work today, they called the supplier of their chemical remover and they didn't know how it reacted to glue (???), so basically I was to ask the manufacturer of my guitar about that. heh.

However, the finish is unchanged from factory. Some chipped paint and so though (and the headstock needs some wood filler). I've read something that you shouldn't use chemical strippers for removing factory finishes.

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If you are going darker in color and the finish seems thin enough, you can simply sand the existing finish and apply the new color on top of it. It is even possible to go lighter, it will just take more coats to achieve the color you want. My ears are not this good, but some claim that they can hear the tone difference that finishes induce in guitars, so you may want to keep coats to a minimum...but that's up to you. There is also the weight factor that each coat will add to your instrument. Personally, I don't like to do more than is needed for any given task...less is more school of thought, but once again that is a personal choice. Anyway...back to the subject, you don't need to take the finish off, just rough it up so the new finish has something to grip. Unless you have a high end guitar, factory finishes are generally thin (not too many coats) to keep costs down and maximize profit so painting over the old finish should be fine. This is the easiest way to refinish an instrument IMO...Rog

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Odds are the the guitar was painted a solid color because the wood underneath wasn't going to look good with a natural finish.

As far as strippers go, alot of the chemical strippers you can buy at a walmart or something, don't hardly touch factory paint. I have a Cort V I am refinishing and I ended up just sanding the finish off, because the chemical stripper wouldn't cut it. Get yourself a random orbit sander and some 60 or 80 grit paper and have at it.

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