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Myka's Neck Pocket Jig


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Ok, what am I doing wrong? I made a simple version of Myka's pocket jig,

c905e762.jpg

but here is my dilema. I can't get deep enough routes. Even with my plunge router set as low as it will go and my pattern bit pulled out some in the collet (I know, I know - very dangerous and stupid), I can't make a deep enough route for the set neck I am currently working on.

Here are my specs:

The top of the guitar sits approximately 3/16 below the bottom edge of the oak slats (bearing guide) for the router. The oak slats are about 1 thick.

jig2

Even if the slats rest flat against the guitar top, I can't get enough depth using a 2.5 inch long pattern bit with a 1.25 inch cutting face. :D I have not found any pattern bits with a longer cutting face than this.

I can't think of any solution except for making the guide slats thinner, but that seems like it will allow too much flex resulting in an inaccurate route. Thanks for any guidance!

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I have not had any problems with cutting deep enough on mine.

55.jpg

I use a bit I got at homedepot that has an abnormally long shaft that allows a deeper cut. The last guitar had the pocket routed almost to the back and I had no trouble reaching.

The guitar is even 1/4" below the oak boards.

Edited by Godin SD
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http://www.routerbits.com/cgi-routerbits/s...4123778_5193+47

check out router bit #3023. If that's not long enough, I don't know what is. I think that's what I used, can't remember off the top of my head though.

peace,

russ

Thank Russ, I think that bit may get me to where I need to be. Except I didn't really want to spend $38 for a bit - ouch!

The heel on this neck is 1.4 inches thick from the bottom of the fretboard (which I want to be flush with the top of the body)

neck heel

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I have not had any problems with cutting deep enough on mine.

55.jpg

I use a bit I got at homedepot that has an abnormally long shaft that allows a deeper cut. The last guitar had the pocket routed almost to the back and I had no trouble reaching.

The guitar is even 1/4" below the oak boards.

Could you let me know what bit you are using? I was at HD today and did not see anything that would work.

Thanks!

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IMHO if you spend the extra money and buy the Whiteside 3023, you'll never be sorry.

Yeah, I came to the same conclusion. I am going to order the bit today.

Thanks for everybodies input!

One more question though. This quote comes from the Woodworkersworld.net website about the 3/4 inch cut diameter bits "***Whiteside recommends the 1 1/8" dia. tools in the 1/2" shank whenever possible due to the fragile nature of the B19 bearing."

Has anybody experienced problems with the smaller bearing? I doubt it will be an issue given relatively light use it will get for guitar building but I just thought I would check.

Thanks again!

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I bought a 1/4" thick piece of Lexan or plexiglass (what ever they sell) from the Home Depot. It is sold in 24" x 24" pieces.

I trimmed it to the size I wanted and it worked fantastic.

The hardest part is cutting it when it keeps melting, but once done clean and straight, works like a charm.

I figure, how many different guitar pockets will I be making?

You can then keep the bit you have.

If you want to see what I did, e-mail me, as I don't kbnow how to post a pictrure on this site yet.

Mike

mperez25@socal.rr.com

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Hydrogeoman, the bearing is a non-issue here because the 2" cutting length bit is only available in a 3/4" cut diameter bit anyway.

That language is right out of Whiteside's company catalog, but there's not a problem with the bearing. It's just that a 3/4" OD bearing with a 1/2" ID is obviously more fragile than a 1 1/8" OD bearing with a 1/2" ID. Even though you're typically taking lighter cuts with a template bit, you could be using as much as 2" of cutting length at some point and that puts a load on the bearing even with a light cut. So the 3/4"bearing won't last as long. But replacing bearings is just another maintenance cost to me, like resharpening or replacing bits and blades. It's a good ideea to have a bearing repair kit or at least a spare or two in the sizes you need.

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+1. Any bearing with narrow walls will be relatively fragile, and easier to cook.

I bore out 90% of my neck pocket with a forstner bit, then use use a template bushing to route within 2mm or so off my final pocket size, and finally use a freud kitchen fitters bit to cut the finished pocket. I run the shank of the cutter against the rails of my neck jig - no bearing to worry about, but you do have to keep the bit moving or you'll burn the rails.

The kitchen fitter bit is 0.5" shank and cut, 2" cutting depth and plenty of shank length to grip it by - about 3.5" length overall. The freud pro cutters are great quality, and best of all, it was on special offer at screwfix - less than £10!

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+1. Any bearing with narrow walls will be relatively fragile, and easier to cook.

I bore out 90% of my neck pocket with a forstner bit, then use use a template bushing to route within 2mm or so off my final pocket size, and finally use a freud kitchen fitters bit to cut the finished pocket. I run the shank of the cutter against the rails of my neck jig - no bearing to worry about, but you do have to keep the bit moving or you'll burn the rails.

The kitchen fitter bit is 0.5" shank and cut, 2" cutting depth and plenty of shank length to grip it by - about 3.5" length overall. The freud pro cutters are great quality, and best of all, it was on special offer at screwfix - less than £10!

Setch - thanks for the tips. I like the idea of a less expensive bit to get the job done! (although I ordered a Whitesides bit that was discussed above over the weekend).

On a side note - how about posting your laminate bending method for pegheads with some pics one of these days?

Cheers

Greg

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I bought a 1/4" thick piece of Lexan or plexiglass (what ever they sell) from the Home Depot. It is sold in 24" x 24" pieces.

I trimmed it to the size I wanted and it worked fantastic.

The hardest part is cutting it when it keeps melting, but once done clean and straight, works like a charm.

I figure, how many different guitar pockets will I be making?

You can then keep the bit you have.

If you want to see what I did, e-mail me, as I don't kbnow how to post a pictrure on this site yet.

Mike

mperez25@socal.rr.com

Spray a little WD40 on the bit before (and depending on size, during) and it will help to keep the bit cool enough so it won't melt.

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I bought a 1/4" thick piece of Lexan or plexiglass (what ever they sell) from the Home Depot. It is sold in 24" x 24" pieces.

I trimmed it to the size I wanted and it worked fantastic.

The hardest part is cutting it when it keeps melting, but once done clean and straight, works like a charm.

I figure, how many different guitar pockets will I be making?

You can then keep the bit you have.

If you want to see what I did, e-mail me, as I don't kbnow how to post a pictrure on this site yet.

Mike

mperez25@socal.rr.com

Spray a little WD40 on the bit before (and depending on size, during) and it will help to keep the bit cool enough so it won't melt.

It wasn't the router bit that made it melt, it was the jig saw when I was cutting the template itself..

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I bought a 1/4" thick piece of Lexan or plexiglass (what ever they sell) from the Home Depot. It is sold in 24" x 24" pieces.

I trimmed it to the size I wanted and it worked fantastic.

The hardest part is cutting it when it keeps melting, but once done clean and straight, works like a charm.

I figure, how many different guitar pockets will I be making?

You can then keep the bit you have.

If you want to see what I did, e-mail me, as I don't kbnow how to post a pictrure on this site yet.

Mike

mperez25@socal.rr.com

Spray a little WD40 on the bit before (and depending on size, during) and it will help to keep the bit cool enough so it won't melt.

It wasn't the router bit that made it melt, it was the jig saw when I was cutting the template itself..

Ahh.. then try a 10t jigsaw bit on slow speed with WD40... it takes a while though....

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