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Headstock Veneer Only One Side?


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I was reading the Benedetto book today and it was talkinga bout headplates and said that it's a bad idea to only add a headplate without also adding a backstraping veneer due to reasons that would lead to the headstock warping. However, he DID mention that this is an issue with maple... but NOT mahogany, yet offers no opinion on the subject for any other woods since he doesn't recommend any others for archtop necks.

My question is this. Does anyone know what woods it's ok to only put a headplate over and not need a backstrapping? I think it'd be helpful if we could get a nice list going (which I'll start below, and update whenever people post).

The reason I ask this is cause I wanna put a wenge headplate over a wenge/bubinga/flamed limba/bubinga/wenge neck-thru (I like neck-thrus... but don't like it when the laminates show in the headstock... don't ask me why...). Does anyone for see a problem with these woods and not backstraping??

The List:

Can have JUST a headplate:

Mahogany

Need backstrapping too:

Maple

Chris

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There aren't any absolutes, and there are many, many Gibsons out there doing just fine with headplates on mahogany and maple necks and no counter veneer. Bendetto makes a good point, which is that it's always best to treat both sides of a piece of wood similarly to avoid warping, but it isn't essential.

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Does Mr Benedetto advertise Ed Roman's matched "US deep neck set tone veneer grails" pairs in the back of the book? I'm sure that a veneer won't have enough mechanical strength to pull a headstock out of whack even if it does warp. Does this have anything to do with the volute curve or just unbalanced laminations in general?

Edited by Prostheta
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Does Mr Benedetto advertise Ed Roman's matched "US deep neck set tone veneer grails" pairs in the back of the book? I'm sure that a veneer won't have enough mechanical strength to pull a headstock out of whack even if it does warp. Does this have anything to do with the volute curve or just unbalanced laminations in general?

its got NOTHING to do with the veneer, its all about the glue line.

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I see. That's pretty interesting as i've never come across anything referring to the mechanical contributions of the glue itself in terms of stability or indeed potential for warping. Is this caused by the "chemical bonding" of the glue into the surfaces of the woods or by movement of the glue medium whilst curing?

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