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Would This Be Possible?


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Well.. think I found a neck and bridge and stuff for a guitar I want.. but no body (i didnt wanna use the body anyways)

I have like no tools.. but saw a router for $50 or so at some hardware store here.. If I bought that, would that be enough to make a body? No bevels/carving, just a body shape, then inside routed... Would using just a router and some sandpaper, would that work??

Might give it a try... Probably will mess it up, but what can ya do..

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Might give it a try... Probably will mess it up, but what can ya do..

Sure it's possible. Although it'd help to have a jigsaw and a ruler too. And at least a dust mask, eye protection and ear protection.

I use my router more than any other tool, it really changes everything. But figure on top of the cost of the router itself, you'll need to lay out for good bits, especially you'll be wanting a set of template bits.

Then it's just a matter of practicing on scrap--no point in screwing up your good wood--and making sure your template is right.

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With time and patience.

You could get it done with a carving knife and wetstone. :D

A router is a very useful tool, but it is only as good as the bits and templates you use. A person could round up a used scroll saw($30-$50) or a used jig saw ($3-$10), and that would help a lot with ruff cutting as well as template construction. If you really want to give making a body a go. Look at the tools and jigs/templates other members use. Start looking at your local Craigs list, used tool shops, nickle ads, etc... A good shopper can make their dollar go a long ways in used tools(we all have limited tool budgets and smart buys really help). Many of the jigs and such that can be made by yourself are quite inexpensive. It just requires work on your part to make them.

Peace,Rich

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you can cut a body out entirely with just a router and a cheap template, just veeeeeryyyy slowly :D

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my first reaction was, "oh dear, another Tony Iommi waiting to happen!"

Router's can be bought very cheaply & so can the cutter's but experience & common sense are much more important. Please don't just go & buy a router without ever using one before...at least borrow someone's so that they can show you how to use it. The booklet that will come with a router will only list the box contents & a few basic warnings, not how to use it. It will not explain why you should cut against the bit, why the bit is digging in, why the collet has come loose or why you've got a template bit sticking out of your thigh.

I don't want to burst your bubble but routers are not a tool that should just be bought on a sunday from a hardware store IMO.

I'd recommend using a jigsaw to cut the body & clean up with sandpaper & files. Cut any cavities with drill bits & auger bits & a very sharp chisel to square of the edges. Basically learn how to work with wood before using specialist tools to cut it up because they won't make up for inexperience.

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Not to burst your bubble, frog, but a less than razor sharp chisel can be just as dangerous as an impropperly setup router. Routers are not that complicated. I'm sure you can find some good literature on how to use them online. And it's wrong to say that a bit's going to fly out and impale you, because more often than not, they just fall to the floor if the collet comes loose. Now broken off carbide tips are another story. My basic warnings for routing would be: make sure everything is tightened on your router before using it, it's better to make many successive shallow cuts rather than one deep one(this counts for all bits), make sure your router is spinning at the propper speed for the bit that's chucked in, and always keep your eyes on the router when it's opperating.

peace,

russ

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that's why I said, "a very sharp chisel"

sure there's lots of literature on the net & plenty of books but I got the impression that Nick doesn't have much experience with woodworking or woodworking tools....& going from no power tool experience to buying a router seems like a disaster waiting to happen. I might be reading too much into his post, I appologise if that's the case but that was my impression & it worried me that nobody had expressed concern.

Edited by biliousfrog
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I agree with BiliousFrog.

Know any tool you are working with...routers are a high-speed cutter so accidents happen at high-speeds too.

Like everyone else said, you can get away with cutting the body with a router, but it's not the intended use of the tool. You will find it frustrating and time consuming. Router Template bits have a tendency to start to slip out of the collett when cutting on all sides of the cutter head. Routers also have a tendency to start to bind up at guitar body depths....you must learn to listen to the sounds that your router makes and interpret that.

You really need to use the router to cleanup the roughness left by other cutting tools.

I'm guessing you are on a budget, but if you can swing it there are some great entry level tools available at Lowes and Home Depot.

Look into a $99.00 9" Delta Band saw. That's what I use in my shop and let me tell you it will save you time and heartache.

If there were a shortlist of must have tools in my shop it would be:

Router

Good set of Router bits

Porter Cable Random Orbit Sander

Band saw

Table saw

Miter saw

Planer(s)

Drill Press

Clamps

Clamps

Clamps

Safety Glasses

Dust Mask

So...

1) Go get you a band saw,

2) Cut out your body template on good quality plywood.

3) Trace that template out on your body blank.

4) Rough cut it (not your fingers) on the band saw SLOWLY.

(Get it within a half inch of the line)

5) On your CLEAN worktable, use some double stick tape to tape down the body blank...Then double stick tape your template onto the body blank so you have a nice little sandwich going on there. Check to make sure that the template is level on all ends because the weight of the router will tend to push down on areas not properly reinforced.

6) Load up your router with the template cutting bit.

7) Make MANY passes with small depth increases.

8) Take it SLOW...let the router do the work.

9) Remove the template and the body blank from the table and start sanding.

Next you will need to start considering how to route the pickup cavities as well as the electronics cavity.

Good luck with it....and be SAFE.

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that's why I said, "a very sharp chisel"

sure there's lots of literature on the net & plenty of books but I got the impression that Nick doesn't have much experience with woodworking or woodworking tools....& going from no power tool experience to buying a router seems like a disaster waiting to happen. I might be reading too much into his post, I appologise if that's the case but that was my impression & it worried me that nobody had expressed concern.

Ah, missed the "very" part of that quote. I think you'll find that a very large percentage of pg'ers go from nearly no woodworking experience to using a router in a very short span of time. I can't say I'm one, but that doesn't change the fact that many people do it with relative success. That's not to say that caution and respect should be used when using any power tool...

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I went from no previous tool experience to using a router (it was the first tool I bought, after sandpaper). The single most useful thing you can get for it is a good sized portion of common sense.

Yes a router is dangerous, but so is any tool. There are a load of posters I see on here who appear terrified of routers, just because they're high speed. That's just stupid, and a quicker path to getting hurt than by paying attention to what you're doing. Respect for tools is good, fear for them is bad.

Saying they shouldn't be bought on a Sunday from a hardware store is just crass, and more likely to put people off building. It kinda reeks of an 'elitist' attitude which this board is completely against imo.

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Any power tool certainly has the potential to do damage. The tool that spooks me the most is a table saw, but it is a healthy fear/respect. Any time you pick up a new tool you should do your home work on how to use it properly. Shoot that is how you find out how to set it up properly to get the job done right, as well as safely. I don't know if I would rate a router as being more dangerous than a jig saw, table saw, drill press etc... You need to understand how to set up and use any of them safely.

Peace,Rich

P.S. I would be more afraid of driving to the hardware store to pick up a new tool. I drive well but you have no idea if you are going to happen by a drunk driver in a 3 ton Cadi with bald tires :D .

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I have been using power tools (router, bandsaw, etc) but recently I've started using hand tools (hand planes, chisels etc) and both can be dangerous. The best way to learn woodworking is to take a class or find a nice cabinet maker that would show you the ropes. In woodworking and espicially guitars there is no substitute for a good teacher.

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Routers are the most dangerous tool in the shop because they have no guards and spin at over 20 000 rpms.This is a tool that demands respect but used properly is reasonably safe.With any tool you are not used to it is a good idea to get someone knowledgable to show you the ins and outs of safety.Don,t be afraid of them just use caution and good sense with any tool.Maybe try the woodshop at your local highschool.I always found my shop teacher helping out on the side.They ussually love shops and tools and are willing to help out.Always make sure your bits are quality and seriously sharp.And wait until the motor has stopped before removing tool from workpiece

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Routers are the most dangerous tool in the shop

god forbid this thread become subjective :D . when's the last time you saw a router toss a piece of lumber like a table saw? I hear about much more skillsaw injuries than router injuries. It all comes down to the user and their common sense in the shop. Study up on what you're using, or anything can be dangerous; that's the bottom line. There's no need to scare anyone out of using tools.

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I used a tablesaw to cut a peice of mahogany once... I used the damaged rip fence to guide a crossgrain cut and then the wood caught on the rough edge of the fence (someone had previously rammed the fence right onto the running blade causing marks on the fence) and the blade suddenly caught too much wood and slammed it against the table, finally the blade got stuck there with the guard and all. I was scared for one second then I switched off the thing and tried to clear it. Thank God I left the guard in place because my friend who took me to the shop took the guard off since he was cutting little squares out of plywood with a tablesaw. I thought to myself if that guard wasnt in place most likely the wood would fly across the room to God knows where...

So dont use a rip fence to cut across a board... use the miter guide (someone had misplaced that thing....) or use a radial arm saw...

And when using table saws always stand clear of the blade, and if possible leave the guard in place... its there for a reason. Last thing you want is an open heart surgery because you slipped using the tablesaw....

Edited by rahimiiii
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I'm much more afraid of table saws or even bandsaws, anything where the blade is exposed.

It takes a lot more effort to get your fingers in the path of a spinning router bit. My router won't let me work with it if my hands aren't on the handles. A plunge router, that is. I'm sure a table router is just as dangerous.

First time I used a router, I put on three coats, including a heavy leather coat. Didn't know what to expect. I'd only ever heard of a router the day before (reading this board, in fact).

Since then, I've developed a safety routine with it --most important, I never move the router until the bit stops spinning completely. And I always wear protective gear anyway.

But I still find it a difficult tool to master, and it definitely requires a lot of care and attention while working.

Respect, that's a good word for how I approach power tools.

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