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Very nice, I like the color on the top, not traditional color tones!

But I see some low spots here in this pic. Did you shoot more laquer to fill this or you spot drop fill and sanded?

FRONT4.jpg

Mostly next to the bridge pup and under the controls.

One question, since I haven't seen any of this finished, how you plan on dressing the steerhead cut out? Black paint or leave it natural?

I did a few test pieces befopre I painted the burst in my bass, and I must add that if you are going to shoot the edge burst like Drak do, you have to make sure that your top is wet sanded (level sanded) to perfection, because it is very easy to sand thru the burst area if you try to level sand after this.

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(In meak and humble voice) Drak....uh sir...if I may be so bold as to suggest something... With that steer-noggin' I think a BIGSBY is in order. Like a D-50. I mean if you think it would be nice, of course, sir.

Seriously though, it is simply awesome. I do have a question though. I am somewhat of an airbrush artist but before my last charvel junk job I never integrated the two. How does a micromeshed bare wood up to say 6000 or 12000 intercoated clear then candy burst with another clear over that? Hmmm...makes me think.

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Lookin pretty sweet Drak. Haven't seen quilt figure like that before.

It definitely will look like a rich sunset when is all buffed and polished.

You mentioned that you use an airbrush to spray the water based aniline burst. Having no clue about airbrush brands, I was wondering what you would recommend? cheers.

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Very nice, I like the color on the top, not traditional color tones!

But I see some low spots here in this pic. Did you shoot more laquer to fill this or you spot drop fill and sanded?

FRONT4.jpg

Mostly next to the bridge pup and under the controls.

One question, since I haven't seen any of this finished, how you plan on dressing the steerhead cut out? Black paint or leave it natural?

I did a few test pieces befopre I painted the burst in my bass, and I must add that if you are going to shoot the edge burst like Drak do, you have to make sure that your top is wet sanded (level sanded) to perfection, because it is very easy to sand thru the burst area if you try to level sand after this.

:D I WANT A TELE LIKE THAT! NOW!

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But I see some low spots here in this pic. Did you shoot more laquer to fill this or you spot drop fill and sanded?

That pic was taken after just the first initial 1500 pass. By the time you're all the way thru 4000, those areas should be (and are) levelled and gone. :D

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But I see some low spots here in this pic. Did you shoot more laquer to fill this or you spot drop fill and sanded?

That pic was taken after just the first initial 1500 pass. By the time you're all the way thru 4000, those areas should be (and are) levelled and gone. :D

I know that they are going to be all done knowing your standards!!!! :D

My doubt was if you just fill them or just kept sanding! I guess just sand them out! I couldn't have done it, since my top coats after the burst were about 2 double coats. No room for error when color sanding that!!!

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That's why you want to shoot many top coats over your final color coat, you need that protection, or insurance, if you want it dead flat, you need a -good- layer of clear to be able to comfortably level sand yourself back to flat. :D

Any and all Maple will 'settle in' like this under lacquer, it's very typical and to be expected.

This is exactly why you want to let it dry for a month or better, so that your lacquer DOES settle out like this. If you don't wait, then you'll level sand it, buff it, then it will continue to settle out like this in the ensuing months after the guitar is done and you'll just have to live with it then.

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  • 2 weeks later...
This is exactly why you want to let it dry for a month or better, so that your lacquer DOES settle out like this. If you don't wait, then you'll level sand it, buff it, then it will continue to settle out like this in the ensuing months after the guitar is done and you'll just have to live with it then.

Does this hold true with any varnish, or is it specific to lacquer?

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This is exactly why you want to let it dry for a month or better, so that your lacquer DOES settle out like this. If you don't wait, then you'll level sand it, buff it, then it will continue to settle out like this in the ensuing months after the guitar is done and you'll just have to live with it then.

Does this hold true with any varnish, or is it specific to lacquer?

Pretty much anything with solvent evaporation, at the very least. So yes, Varnish too.

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Pretty much anything with solvent evaporation, at the very least. So yes, Varnish too.

Well, of course, I'm talking about this oil varnish I've been using, which doesn't have solvents, so the curing is all oxygen reaction...but since I just finished a guitar using it, and it happens to have maple on the top and back, I imagine I'll be finding out pretty soon :D

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