Jump to content

Can You Remove Frets?


Recommended Posts

So I am still redoing that p-bass and I would like to do some inlay work on the neck my question is sort of two. First you do need to remove the metal frets to put abalone markings in right? And my second is, is if you do have to remove them how should I do that without hurting the finish and can I reinstall the old ones and how wouldd I go about reinstalling them? Thank you

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Are them dot inlays or block inlays? The dots you shouldn't need to pull anything. Blocks are a little trickier, but I found a way to radius them without pulling any frets. When you need to pull the frets you need a fret puller but it doesnt end there. Generally, unless you're a pro, you'll mangle the frets taking them out. So you'll need new frets. Then you'll need to cut and bend the frets to match the radius. Then of course, press. (not to mention leveling and filing)

Yes I like Stewmac

You can buy a radius block and put sand paper on that, then put rub the inlay against the sandpaper. voila, preradiused inlays. Unless you like fret work, you shouldn't need to pull the frets.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You can do whatever you want; it's your guitar. Like I said, you just cut the spot for the inlays, Use a radius block that matches the radius of your fretboard. Add sandpaper. Rub the inlay against the radius block so that it is curved to the radius of your fretboard and use fine grit sand paper to get it just right. once its done, it should be flush against the fretboard. Glue it in and your done.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The problem I see with Weaponepsilon's plan is that you need to get your cavities precisely the depth of your inlay or do some interesting shimming from underneath. My experience is you'll get a much nicer look if you sand the inlay flush after it's been installed, which will involve sanding the whole board slightly while your at it. Hence, no frets.

Even if you pulled the frets, your router base will slide around on a curved surface - (I assume since you're talking about pulling frets, the neck is already radiused.) In the cases where I'm inlaying on a radiused board, I usually make up a jig to hold the router base over the neck/fretboard, so that the base rides on two rails on either side of the fretboard, rather than resting on the curved surface.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Are them dot inlays or block inlays? The dots you shouldn't need to pull anything. Blocks are a little trickier, but I found a way to radius them without pulling any frets. When you need to pull the frets you need a fret puller but it doesnt end there. Generally, unless you're a pro, you'll mangle the frets taking them out. So you'll need new frets. Then you'll need to cut and bend the frets to match the radius. Then of course, press. (not to mention leveling and filing)

Yes I like Stewmac

You can buy a radius block and put sand paper on that, then put rub the inlay against the sandpaper. voila, preradiused inlays. Unless you like fret work, you shouldn't need to pull the frets.

your not some secret undercover salesman for stewmac are ya??
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...