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What Kind Of Wood Is This?


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I offered to thickness some fingerboards for the guitarist of my band because they looked pretty bad. 4 Ebony boards (1 not pictured) and 1 unidentified board. The color of the board reminds me of Koa, far right in this picture.

FingerboardWoods.jpg

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Could be Indian Rosewood or Mexican Rosewood, or any one of several other Rosewoods.

Is it the same weight as the Ebony?

Koa typically isn't quite as heavy, and that doesn't really look like Koa to me, but you would need to post a REAL closeup of it for us to really inspect it.

I wouldn't be using no steenkin' Koa for a fingerboard anyway... :D

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How hard is the wood? and what is the weight like?

It looks like it could even be Shedua(Ovangkol or Amazakoue). It is very similar in weight and texture to Bubinga. Hard to say without a little more info. Hardness, density, smell, pores are all clues that really help. Sometimes color and grain can be a little deseptive.

Peace,Rich

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Nor would I use Koa for a fingerboard.

The weight isn't comparable to Ebony. It's definitely not Indian Rosewood, it is fairly less dense than IRW and produces a very light colored dust. This piece is thicknessed sanded and sanded up to 320, so it's at about it's natural color.

FingerboardWoods1.jpg

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How hard is the wood? and what is the weight like?

It looks like it could even be Shedua(Ovangkol or Amazakoue). It is very similar in weight and texture to Bubinga. Hard to say without a little more info. Hardness, density, smell, pores are all clues that really help. Sometimes color and grain can be a little deseptive.

Peace,Rich

It's hard to say at this point, I've done very little work on this wood. It sands very well, with the density less than Hard Maple, more dense than African Mahogany. The grain at first reminded me a bit of some Bubinga, but it has very small grain pores, and lots of them!

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I found a good source for ID'ing wood, with the most accurate pictures I've seen yet. I managed to identify my mahogany (which I thought was Honduras) as being actually African mahogany. The picture was a perfect match. Same goes for a piece of English oak I have laying around. Anyway, you have the wood so it should be easier to ID for you than me.

http://www.woodfinder.com/woods/woodindex.php

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I'm keeping my thoughts on this one to myself, as it's not going to get you closer to your goal. B)

But I will say this..................If we ever find out what that f/board is, it is secondary to the fact that you've

all thrown in a heap of great links to timber colours and variations therein.

I've just added them all to my favourites folder :D

(pssst.......I don't think it's koa/acacia/blackwood) bugger, couldn't help myself. :D

Blackwood/acacia

cheers, Stu

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I am guessing Shedua in part because it is a fretboard, but I could also see it as Black Limba. You really have to just look at density, pores, smell and such. Black Limba

I also think that hint of curl/figure in the board is also swaying me tward Shedua or Limba because it is very common to find a bit of figure like that. Mind you my guesses are based on what I see in lumber. Most of the time we see a lot of rare figured or unique boards pictured on the net. The two links that have been posted to picture sights are pretty darn good at giving you a better look at the spectrum of looks you find in these woods.

Peace,Rich

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I appreciate the information and help guys. This wood is definitely Ovangkol. I believe I have heard of this wood being used in Warwick's. I'd definitely love to find some more of it, it's beautiful and not a pain to sand (no clogging / not overkill on density).

The pores are a bit like Limba, but from my experience, Limba has always had the same sized pores at a very consistent rate. The pores in this wood range a bit and they're all over the place, more consistent than Limba. Rich, I can't really do much more with this wood to determine the density (other than weighing it and I don't have access to a scale), and I've been sick off and on the past few weeks. Still can't smell anything. :D

On the topic of Limba, I'll try and get a picture of the board I plan on bookmatching for an acoustic top in the distant future.

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I appreciate the information and help guys. This wood is definitely Ovangkol. I believe I have heard of this wood being used in Warwick's. I'd definitely love to find some more of it, it's beautiful and not a pain to sand (no clogging / not overkill on density).

The pores are a bit like Limba, but from my experience, Limba has always had the same sized pores at a very consistent rate. The pores in this wood range a bit and they're all over the place, more consistent than Limba. Rich, I can't really do much more with this wood to determine the density (other than weighing it and I don't have access to a scale), and I've been sick off and on the past few weeks. Still can't smell anything. :D

On the topic of Limba, I'll try and get a picture of the board I plan on bookmatching for an acoustic top in the distant future.

Ovangkol/Shedua or whatever it is being called. Is not really that uncommon. You can find it at most hardwood dealers(sold as lumber). Shedua(guibourtia ehie ) is closely related to Bubinga(guibourtia tessmannii ), and I could see how Warwick could be attracted to using it. Most of the retailers around here sell it for about the same as Bubinga(about the $10-12bd.ft range). Gilmer usually has some very colorful and nicely figured pieces available(cost is usually higher than lumber of course).

A Limba soundboard sounds cool :D . I have never really got into the Mahog/Koa or other hardwood soundboards(Maybe one of these days when I have a few more acoustics under my belt I will have tried a few more things out- So many things to try and so little time).

Peace,Rich

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Thanks again Rich! I haven't seen any sold around my area, so it's unheard of to me. It's just nice to come by a piece of wood every now and then that I have never heard of or worked with, definitely an educational process.

Regarding the Limba, I'm sure it will sound cool. The acoustic will either be my first build guided by a luthier or just a distant future build when I get more acoustic builds under my belt. I don't have any close-up shots of the wood, but I have cut it down to about 30-34" x 9" x 3/4". It's already been air-drying for about a year, around 6-8% moisture content.

Limbacloseup.jpg

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That is a cool piece of wood you have there. I wish I had a luthier to guide me on my acoustics. I am sure I would have learned a lot faster and would be much further along today. If you are ever wanting to look around at cool acoustic woods. Take a peek at RCTonewoods.com Bob C. has a great looking site and lots of great woods to look through.

Peace,Rich

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