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Some Final Questions


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Well, the project is finally winding down and I'm in the home stretch. I just have some final questions to ask... How many quarts of nitro lacquer should I buy to do an ibanez jem with opaque white coloring? What's a good way to round the back of the neck (I don't really trust myself enough to use a rasp :-\ )? I'm sure I'll have some more, I'll add them as I think of them. OH! Where's that one website with the pictoral diagram of how a jem7vwh electronics are set up? I'm really crappy when it comes to understanding schemata like that, but I remember a website that was just like pictures and I totally got it :-P

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How many quarts? A quart is quite a bit of liquid, I would imagine a pint being enough for a few guitars. Refer to this thread here for shaping a neck.

http://projectguitar.ibforums.com/index.php?showtopic=28358

The most important tool to have when shaping a neck is a straight edge, this will guarantee you get the right measurements when shaping.

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Basically use 'enough'. If it's a pint, a quart, or a gallon. If you spray you will use more. If you brush the surface will take a lot more work to level and you might damage the white layer. Don't constrain yourself to a certain volume. Put on however much or little you think is enough.

-Doug

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When I first started building necks,i rounded the back with sandpaper.I bought some beltsander paper and used it side to side like a towel with the neck supported at both ends between two chairs.TSL602000 suggested this to me and it worked like a charm.But that was only on my first two necks,after that I started using a rasp.

As far as the paint goes,that depends on a lot of factors,like Doug said.On my last one I bought a gallon of catalyzed varnish and i used about a quart i think on that guitar,but it was fretboard and all.Nice thick finish.

By the way,Doug,that is the one I used that flamed fretboard on that I got from you.I love that fretboard.

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Well I'm glad you liked that fingerboard!! Curly like that is getting harder to come by...for a reasonable price that is.

How did the catalyzed varnish work out? What kind was it?

I've taken to shooting maple fingerboards with polyester prior to fretting these days. Man, that works so sweet! I rub it down with 0000 steel wool after sanding to 1500 which makes a wonderful feeling fingerboard.

-Doug

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I've taken to shooting maple fingerboards with polyester prior to fretting these days. Man, that works so sweet! I rub it down with 0000 steel wool after sanding to 1500 which makes a wonderful feeling fingerboard.

That IS interesting..I guess you shoot the fretboard thin?film thickness I mean?And there are not problems with fret seating?I may try that next time i finish a fretboard.

The catalyzed varnish worked well.I am extremely happy with it.It's hard to say how durable it is,but so far I am not having the scuffing that I used to when i finished out of a spray can with deft.It definately builds better and is clearer.It feels similar in hardness to a nitro finished gibson,without the stickyness.I guess only time will tell how well it holds up...

I don't know if you saw the guitar.I did have some finishing problems that hopefully won't recur again,but it was my first time with that finish.

http://projectguitar.ibforums.com/index.ph...28048&st=75

Oh...the catalyzed varnish was sherwinn williams sher-wood water white conversion varnish.

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I've taken to shooting maple fingerboards with polyester prior to fretting these days. Man, that works so sweet! I rub it down with 0000 steel wool after sanding to 1500 which makes a wonderful feeling fingerboard.

That IS interesting..I guess you shoot the fretboard thin?film thickness I mean?And there are not problems with fret seating?I may try that next time i finish a fretboard.

Oh...the catalyzed varnish was sherwinn williams sher-wood water white conversion varnish.

Yes, thin. It has to be. I actually thin it with MEK 50/50 instead of straight like when I shoot guitar bodies. It has to be sanded level again because surface tension makes it build heavily on the edges of the fret slots. After leveling I go through each slot with the hand slot saw to make sure they are still the correct depth and free of 'goop' that may have run down them.

The finish ends up being very thin, then when I press the frets in I just be careful not to use so much pressure. This eliminates the possibility of 'denting' the surface and popping the finish loose either side of the fret slots.

By the way...Deft is really soft, then turns brittle. Use McFadden or Behlen Stringed Instrument lacquer. McFadden being the top choice.

-Doug

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Ended up using a rasp :D It turned out pretty damn good for never using one before. Fretboard was glued and it's drying now B) I don't have enough time to inlay it though - the project is due the 11th, so I guess I'll have to inlay it later :D Still need those wiring pictures though!!

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