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Making A Resonator Guitar


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Most likely your acoustic has a domed top, so no.

Also, you have to have TOTALLY different types of bracing for a reso guitar. So you'd have to unglue the top and back, unglue the braces, then take HOURS to clean up all the unglueing, unradius the rims, re-brace, etc. etc.

By that time you might as well have just built your own...

Chris

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There is a guy locally that makes "Beltona" resonator guitars. I went and talked to him a couple of times and bought a fingerboard off him when I built my first guitar (Acoustic). He makes the bodies from fibreglass using a mould and has a Mahogany neck bolted on. Very nice looking but certainly an acquired taste.

If you are building your own you would have to design the top to accommodate the resonator cone etc.

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I remember a two part trade secrets or similar from the time they were to be found in the printed Stewmac catalog. It covered, step by step, a conversion from ordinary flattop acoustic yard sales finding to a playable resonator (single cone) guitar. It was supposed to be carried out in an afternoon. Can’t find that on the Stewmac “free info” pages anymore.

What he did was simply cut up a circular hole in the top, glue a plug in the old sound hole, clear some of the braces that would interfere with the sound well, cut circular rings from plywood, cut them up in one place to be able to twist them in place through the hole in the top and glued them in place. Then he installed the cone, bridge and tail piece. With a quick and dirty cover made from scrap masonite he was ready to play it

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I remember a two part trade secrets or similar from the time they were to be found in the printed Stewmac catalog. It covered, step by step, a conversion from ordinary flattop acoustic yard sales finding to a playable resonator (single cone) guitar. It was supposed to be carried out in an afternoon. Can’t find that on the Stewmac “free info” pages anymore.

What he did was simply cut up a circular hole in the top, glue a plug in the old sound hole, clear some of the braces that would interfere with the sound well, cut circular rings from plywood, cut them up in one place to be able to twist them in place through the hole in the top and glued them in place. Then he installed the cone, bridge and tail piece. With a quick and dirty cover made from scrap masonite he was ready to play it

That's exactly what I am looking for ....

= Raf =

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I found it! It’s in the Trade Secrets book two. Al Rorick’s Do-it-yourself Dobro. I was basically right. The only difference is that he cut the braces flush with the hole and notched the first layer of plywood. Might also add that he used an old classic 23” scale thing that might not had that much bracing to interfere with the sound well.

Reading through it now I can say that he probably got the same problem I got when doing my “resolectric”. Too Little downward pressure on the cone due to the lack of neck angle (bad research in my behalf). I cannot get a good enough tone from my so a neck reset is coming up. If possible, look for a guitar with a slight neck angle and you should be fine. But then again; a flattop with a neck angle… Nothing you se everyday.

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