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Bloodwood?


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I've never heard of pulgo. But I dunno, it doesn't really look like bloodwood to me. Possible, but I don't think so.

I have never heard of pulgo before, could be Algarrobo, but from what i remember Algarrobo is more orangey. This one is like a brick in color if you will...

Never seen bloodwood here though but i can find purpleheart, which is also a native species.

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How heavy is the wood? Is it brittle? What does it smell like when sanded? There are a few commonly sold woods that can look like that. Redheart, Bloodwood(Satine), chakte kok(seeing more of this around lately), Pink Ivory, and even Padauk at times.

Peace,Rich

Very heavy and hard, i don't know how brittle it is though. And i doubt it is Chakte Kok, Pink Ivory or Padauk cuz here they don't import woods :D . I haven't smelled it when sanded though...

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It's definitely not Padauk if it's very heavy and hard, It's dense wood, but not that dense. But you already ruled out that wood. Pink Ivory is a possibility since the wood is extremely dense, but I highly doubt someone would be uneducated about the wood - I'm sure that piece would be worth $700-1000+ if it were Pink Ivory.

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to add on Fryovanis comment what does it smell like

it looks to light in color to be bloodwood but that could be the pic

bloodwood has an almost Cinnamon like smell and very sweet

I haven't had a chance to sand it yet, i'll doi it tomorrow morning and tell you, and the color is accurate despite it being a crappy pic.

I have another piece where it has some sapwood and it's yellowish...

I just bought it to see if it was bloodwood, and it wasn't that expensive but well i guess it would do nicely as neck laminates...

I don't know if it's pìnk ivory,. i was told the same in the Moser Forum BUT, pink ivory is from Brazil, but like i said, all woods sold here are native species, no import timbers :D ( that means no maple, no ash, no alder :D )

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Brosimum Paraense is the common bloodwood that we see here in the US, and is native to South America. Very heavy, very hard, almost like ebony. But red.

Is bloodwood really that intensely red?? according to woodworkerssource.com it is strawberry red in color, and if it's like ebony but red i would love to get a piece of it.

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Redwood has a couple of different colors I have seen, but one is very red. It's a lot like your photo, but more red. The other color is this piece off to the left. Of course it can vary anywhere between these two colors, but they don't vary much. The color in the picture is very close to the one in the original post, the camera didn't take that accurate of a picture. I blame the yellow counter, I always get on pictures on it.

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Bloodwood

It seems to fit that it could be bloodwood, its hard, heavy, red and local. Though as stated it looks pale, but lets see what happend after sanding, might become more obvious what it is.

This page about mesquite shows that name algaroba. As you said it looks a bit more orange than red, again lets see what happens after sanding and another pic

Mesquite (algaroba)

Good luck! J

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Bloodwood

It seems to fit that it could be bloodwood, its hard, heavy, red and local. Though as stated it looks pale, but lets see what happend after sanding, might become more obvious what it is.

This page about mesquite shows that name algaroba. As you said it looks a bit more orange than red, again lets see what happens after sanding and another pic

Mesquite (algaroba)

Good luck! J

I'm starting to think it's Algaroba :D

I compared to a piece of "mahogany " i have ( I think it'0s santos mahogany cuz it's HARD and heavy) and it somewhat orangey in color...damn i want some real red bloodwood :D

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I'll second the folks that say Bloodwood smells like Cinnamon, it does indeed: very spicy smelling, like no other wood.

Looks wise, that wood looks almost oxidized with a whitish film on it. Padouk can do that. Bloodwood, if anything, just gets more orange-brown colored if it'd be sitting out in the sunlight too long.

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It does look somewhat like some of the Padauk blanks I have sitting here, but I'm no expert.

But I interject the thread mostly because the talk of bloodwood smelling like cinnamon makes me wonder if anyone else noticed Padauk smelling like Play-doh when it's being worked, or if it's just me.

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Padouk does smell vaguely like Play-Doh and is pretty intense when you start sawing it (looks like you through a bag of Cheeto's in a mulcher). It has a habit of being an irritant, both to the skin and eyes (at least mine). It can be tough to tell the two apart if they're rough or haven't been sanded recently, but freshly planed Padouk is definitely orange (though clear coats make it look darker) and Bloodwood is very much blood red colored (clear coats really enhance that effect).

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Chamo ¿que nombre te dieron en el aserradero?

Now. I used to work with Venezuelan woods while living in Valencia and remember a purpleish wood, but I can't recall the name now. Also remember that many Brazilian woods are found in Venezuela as both countries share amazonian borders.

There was wonderful and weird looking wood around the Guacharo's cave area but never got to work with it. Look it around. It is reddish with yellow and brown stripes. Don't worry about Maple and such and try an use your local woods. There are some very nice, cheap and unknown woods around that can be used to make great instruments.

Nicolas Volpe is a personal friend and he uses Carretero for some fretboards and it looks awesome! You can even find some excellent Venezuelan Mahogany that has as good a sound/look as Honduras. I have even seen many "bird's eye" planks of Venezuelan Mahogany and they are stunning.

Un saludo desde España :D

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Chamo ¿que nombre te dieron en el aserradero?

Now. I used to work with Venezuelan woods while living in Valencia and remember a purpleish wood, but I can't recall the name now. Also remember that many Brazilian woods are found in Venezuela as both countries share amazonian borders.

There was wonderful and weird looking wood around the Guacharo's cave area but never got to work with it. Look it around. It is reddish with yellow and brown stripes. Don't worry about Maple and such and try an use your local woods. There are some very nice, cheap and unknown woods around that can be used to make great instruments.

Nicolas Volpe is a personal friend and he uses Carretero for some fretboards and it looks awesome! You can even find some excellent Venezuelan Mahogany that has as good a sound/look as Honduras. I have even seen many "bird's eye" planks of Venezuelan Mahogany and they are stunning.

Un saludo desde España :D

I'll write in english cuz it would be unpolite to write in spanish B), the name they gave me was Pulgo, later on they told me it was algarrobo, the alagarrobo i've seen before is more orangey, this used to be a bit more reddish, like a brick, if you will. It is true here in Venezuela there are awesome woods to work with BUT most oif them are forbidden to be cut/deal with them, I can name 3 of them from the top of my head and they are Mahogany, Spanish cedar and Pardillo.

Spanish cedar makes an excellent substitute for mahoganym, it looks almost the same and the strenght is around the same ( it is the same families species) but has a really fragant and pleasant smell to it, it's also cheaper and can still be found and sometimes has a quilt or flames pattern to it, I'm buildiung a Jackson Kelly body and a section of the body is quilted. I haven't found mahogany in pieces big enough anymore and the mahogany from Venezuela is the same species as Honduras Mahogany :D Brazilian Mahogany, Honduras mahogany, south american mahogany, they are all the same B)

Pardillo looks like Limba, specially like black limba, if i find a piece i'll use for a PRS style guitar i don't know about the sound properties, but as far as looks are concerned, it looks awesome.

I do use local woods, I'm a very good friend of Claudio Dalia in Maracaibo, i live in Ciudad Ojeda which is an hour away from Maracaibo, and i use for fretboards a wood called Quebracho, very dark in color, almost like ebony. I said i wish i had maple because of it's color it constrasts very well with Algarrobo, Bloodwood, or Purplheart ( that's the purple wood you're talking about, in Venezuela is called Zapatero and i love it for necks and everything i can build guitar wise with it)

Here in the Zulia state i think it's harder to get the more exotic woods, i was told when i bought Purpleheart that it is brought from Ciudad Bolivar and Puerto Ordaz so my guess is that these kind of woods are easier to find in Valencia or Caracas, than in Maracaibo ( after all, this is like a separate country! :D we get everything the last)

Edited by eddiewarlock
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  • 2 weeks later...

Dude! Somehow I never got the message that you had replied to this post. Hence the delay with my answer.

I have been asking my cousin in Valencia who runs Aserradero Girardot and he could not give me any solution to the Maple dilemma. There has to be some clear/blonde figured wood to work with, but I just can't seem to find any and Italo only gives me Pine family options. Those of course are out of the question.

I wish I was of more help. Maybe some clear Saman logs could do. I have no idea.

Zapatero!!! So that's the name of the reddish striped wood? I remember some beautiful woodworks from the stores in Caripe and "Cuevas de Guacharo".

Best of luck and Give my regards to "La república independiente del Zulia" :D

Later.

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Dude! Somehow I never got the message that you had replied to this post. Hence the delay with my answer.

I have been asking my cousin in Valencia who runs Aserradero Girardot and he could not give me any solution to the Maple dilemma. There has to be some clear/blonde figured wood to work with, but I just can't seem to find any and Italo only gives me Pine family options. Those of course are out of the question.

I wish I was of more help. Maybe some clear Saman logs could do. I have no idea.

Zapatero!!! So that's the name of the reddish striped wood? I remember some beautiful woodworks from the stores in Caripe and "Cuevas de Guacharo".

Best of luck and Give my regards to "La república independiente del Zulia" :D

Later.

Hehehe, republica independiente del zulia! :D

are you spansih, venezuelan or german? or all 3 at once? hehehe

Zapatero is the name of that purple wood, known in english as purpleheart B)

I don't like to buy saman cuz i can't never find a piece that's dry. the one i used on my PRS was a very old piece a friend of mine gave me and then i proceeded to bookmatch it

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