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If you really want to build one from scratch, I would suggest doing a strat style guitar, ( you don't have to worry about the neck angle) although if you check out the tutorial section on the home page there is plenty of material for you to read.

Another reason for making a strat for your project is once the body is routed out most of the hardware screws to the scratch plate. March may seem a long way away but as Wez alluded to, in guitar build terms it isn't.

Welcome to the forum and I hope all goes well.

Edited by jaycee
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I was not just thinking about the guitar build, we all know that 15-16 yr olds that put the effort in can really suprise us and produce great guitars. The issue is that the practical side of the course is most likely worth a lot less than the paperwork side, Building the guitar from scratch will be a hell of a lot to learn and do before march, but not only that you still have to write up the coursework - - - and i bet you have a hell of a lot more coursework to get done this year as well.

I teach so i know what these courses are like, i guess its in the UK since you said year 11 rather than what grade you are in but could be wrong on that. If i am right, with uk courses you get very few marks on the practical side - most will come from the portfolio work

My guess is the project will revolve around improving an existing design somehow to meet a customers needs - the best way to fulfill requirements like that is not to copy a strat or tele. It doesnt matter how well you do it you wont get marks for just copying an established design.

my guess is you need to make changes to the design that you can argue are "improvements", the easiest way to fulfill these requirements is by adding some "ergonomic" shaping and reducing weight somehow. i have just had to talk a kid out of making a pine guitar because another teacher had told him how the weight loss would be a real design improvement, they probably would get really good marks for doing that but no point if it will sound cack

you have to balance the need to make a good guitar with actually passing the course and the best way is to just make a new body design and use existing parts - if you do that well you will probably be marked higher than if you do a guitar from scratch that has some issues (like most peoples firsts do)

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our cousework in materials is only 25% of the final mark rest if it is an exam and practical.

ive printed out the head angles and the neck section looks quiet easy bet it isnt though

got a body template doing sort of a gibson sg style and got a head design my own design

im going to go for it and make it from scratch me thinks i like a challenge

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I was not just thinking about the guitar build, we all know that 15-16 yr olds that put the effort in can really suprise us and produce great guitars. The issue is that the practical side of the course is most likely worth a lot less than the paperwork side, Building the guitar from scratch will be a hell of a lot to learn and do before march, but not only that you still have to write up the coursework - - - and i bet you have a hell of a lot more coursework to get done this year as well.

I teach so i know what these courses are like, i guess its in the UK since you said year 11 rather than what grade you are in but could be wrong on that. If i am right, with uk courses you get very few marks on the practical side - most will come from the portfolio work

My guess is the project will revolve around improving an existing design somehow to meet a customers needs - the best way to fulfill requirements like that is not to copy a strat or tele. It doesnt matter how well you do it you wont get marks for just copying an established design.

my guess is you need to make changes to the design that you can argue are "improvements", the easiest way to fulfill these requirements is by adding some "ergonomic" shaping and reducing weight somehow. i have just had to talk a kid out of making a pine guitar because another teacher had told him how the weight loss would be a real design improvement, they probably would get really good marks for doing that but no point if it will sound cack

you have to balance the need to make a good guitar with actually passing the course and the best way is to just make a new body design and use existing parts - if you do that well you will probably be marked higher than if you do a guitar from scratch that has some issues (like most peoples firsts do)

+1

I did GCSE design and technology, and what Wes says is probably good advice if thats what you are doing. The course seemed more about ticking boxes on the marksheet than it was actually about the quality of the product in some ways, which was annoying.

Ergonomic improvements seemed to be a big thing when I did it and so did mass production. Its a while since I did the course but my teacher seemed keen on us all explaining how we would adapt our designs so they could be mass produced. For a guitar that should be easy... just talk about CNC machines, or maybe watch that godin factory tour video on youtube for ideas.

It may not be impossible but it would be ambitious to do it completely from scratch if you are completely new to this. If you already have most of the knowledge of how a guitar works and some fairly decent woodworking skills then it may be worth a shot, but it will be time consuming, and you may have to put in some time outside lessons.

I'd also suggest an oil finish, because a decent lacquer finish is hard and time consuming with spray cans.

Whatever you do, I'd advise you buy "Make your own electric guitar" by Melvin Hiscock. Its a really useful book.

And while it would probably be good advice for a beginner doing this as a hobby with limited tools, I'll have to disagree with the suggestion of ditching the arm carve and belly cut in this situation. Those are just the sort of ergonomic improvements that will earn you marks (make sure you mention them in the written work), and they shouldnt be too hard to do when you have a school workshop full of tools at your disposal.

Good luck!

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im getting a free neck off a friend this sunday, its a fender strat maple wood, so the hardest part done,

ive got a couple of ideas for wood type so what ive thought is american walnut and maple. which is probably the better of the two??

starting on paint design aswell going to go custom paint, stencils and air brush

jimbob

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