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Clear-coating


jackruby
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Hello everyone :D

I apologize if this question has been answered before but I could not find it easily.

I have sprayed a coat of polyurethane and it dried. I then took 0000 steel wool to prepare it for the next coat but now the poly is scratched and scuffed and doesnt look good :D Is this normal? Will spraying the next coat hide these blemishes or should I buff out the scratched coat first?

Thanks B)

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Yes the scratches will hide in the next coat. Make sure the surfaces are clean before spraying the next coat. You don't want sanding dust in the clear.

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What poly did you use? And why are you scuffing between coats? If it is can stuff, it should adhere with no need to scuff. You only do this if you have imperfections and if not at the end before final buffing. If it is 2K, then you have a window that you have to finish your coats, if not then you need to sand with no more than 1500 and that is even pushing it.

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Yes the scratches will hide in the next coat. Make sure the surfaces are clean before spraying the next coat. You don't want sanding dust in the clear.

Thanks B)

What poly did you use? And why are you scuffing between coats? If it is can stuff, it should adhere with no need to scuff. You only do this if you have imperfections and if not at the end before final buffing. If it is 2K, then you have a window that you have to finish your coats, if not then you need to sand with no more than 1500 and that is even pushing it.

I come from 'old skool' I suppose. I used to build plastic model cars and that's how we always used to lay down coats. I've never done a clear coat though so I wasnt TOO sure :D

The poly is minwax spray.

I appreciate the replies :D

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I'm planning to use gloss polyurethane on a Thinline Tele I'm putting together, I didn't know I'd need to polish it at all when I got the final coat on it................. :D Are you sure about doing this step? Please tell me more if this is in fact needed because I want to do what will be best for the finished product.

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I sprayed another coat last night and the scuffs DID hide :D:D I was sure they would but something like this, you just hate to have to redo it LOL

Now onto searching this forum for tips on final buffing :D:D

Hold on there cowboy...I'd venture you're still about 8 coats short of being able to buff out.

Rattle can poly is way thinner than the stuff folks shoot out of HVLP guns, so it goes on very thin. Unless you're laying it down rather thick (in which case it wouldn't be all that dry after a day), keep scuff sanding between coats and shoot about 10.

Then let it cure for at least 2 weeks (or more) so it is rock hard before you buff. You shouldn't be able to smell any solvents coming off, or be able to dent the finish with your fingernail at all. If you try to buff too early, it will look like hell....tiny scratches everywhere, little gloss.

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I'm planning to use gloss polyurethane on a Thinline Tele I'm putting together, I didn't know I'd need to polish it at all when I got the final coat on it................. :D Are you sure about doing this step? Please tell me more if this is in fact needed because I want to do what will be best for the finished product.

Yea, you'll want to buff out the final coat to give it a high shine.

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I sprayed another coat last night and the scuffs DID hide :D:D I was sure they would but something like this, you just hate to have to redo it LOL

Now onto searching this forum for tips on final buffing B):D

Hold on there cowboy...I'd venture you're still about 8 coats short of being able to buff out.

Rattle can poly is way thinner than the stuff folks shoot out of HVLP guns, so it goes on very thin. Unless you're laying it down rather thick (in which case it wouldn't be all that dry after a day), keep scuff sanding between coats and shoot about 10.

Then let it cure for at least 2 weeks (or more) so it is rock hard before you buff. You shouldn't be able to smell any solvents coming off, or be able to dent the finish with your fingernail at all. If you try to buff too early, it will look like hell....tiny scratches everywhere, little gloss.

Thanks for the feedback :D

I have 6 coats now and do plan on at LEAST 10. I didn't know the rattle-can products are thinner but I shouldve known that...simple physics. haha

I've also read that the spray poly is nearly usable overnight but yes, I'd planned on waiting about a month or more before I started the final steps B):D

again, thanks for listening and helping :D

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Thanks for the info,,, I've read it all,, I still have a question though,,,,,,,,, of all the threads/posts NONE specifically mention the type of poly everyone is using,,,,,,,,, the type I'm wanting to use is the plain old gloss polyurethane in spray cans like you'd buy at Lowe's to finish or refinish a piece of furniture,,,,,,,,, can or should you sand and buff out this type of poly or just leave it alone after the finial coat? The reason I ask is that any piece of furniture I've finished has had a pretty good gloss after the top coat is done..........

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of all the threads/posts NONE specifically mention the type of poly everyone is using

Sure they have. It takes some time but the info IS in here. Heres a pic I've posted in the past. The body was cut from one solid block of wrn maple.

body%20043.jpg

The poly I used did not need any wetsanding or polishing. It basically levelled out to a mirror finish. Easiest guitar I ever built. :D

Edited by Southpa
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Wow, that stuff turned out better than I expected it might. While buying some different finishing stuff to test out, I actually picked up a can of that exact stuff to test out, it just looked and seemed like something that would be well suited for guitar finishing. I have yet to run the test, but it looks as though it would definitely do the job. I don't really know why I grabbed it, all I need is a gun and I can spray as I already have a compressor. I'm sure I'll use up that can on smaller projects though, either way glad to see it turned out so well, I've seen that stuff at every hardware store I've been to lately. I guess no one has an excuse now for poor finish jobs, lol. Nice finish SP. J

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Watch out for that minwax, I used it over duplicolor and at the begining it turned out great, but it didn't adhere and it peeled out like snakes skin. I'm sure that over bare wood it will be better because the wood will absorb a little and make it bite good to the wood. As far as sanding, some products are better than other, but a lot of the time it is on the painters hands. Runs, dry coats, orange peel and other things can mess up the paint and you will have to color sand.

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Same one you can get at Lowes. But I don't use it anymore. It reacts to the rubber and foam on both stands that Ihave and the paint got "eaten" by the stands. Also, the paint altho colpetely cured, while the guitar was in the case on transit to Korea (about 45 days) the finish got marked by the case fabric. No such problem with Bethlens nitro.

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Same one you can get at Lowes. But I don't use it anymore. It reacts to the rubber and foam on both stands that I have and the paint got "eaten" by the stands. Also, the paint altho colpetely cured, while the guitar was in the case on transit to Korea (about 45 days) the finish got marked by the case fabric. No such problem with Bethlens nitro.

C r a p, I guess I'll be using something else after all............ I guess I need to buy some rattle cans from stew mac or reranch............ OR buy some laquar and learn to use me spray gun,,,,, I hate to screw up this body though, I'd rather "learn" on a very plain solid body.

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Bust out your Yellow Pages and start calling local places that sell finishing products; when you find some that fit what you're looking for (HVLP guns, urethane, nitro), go in there and start chatting up the guys behind the counter. You'll get way more than enough info to get you started.

Edited by erikbojerik
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