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Headstock Angle


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Is there any benefit to a 15 deg headstock angle vs a 13 deg headstock angle, or vise versa? what is the minimum useful angle for a guitar headstock and why? Is there a maximum useful angle? I'm thinking of using a smaller angle (13 deg or less) to add a bit of strength to the headstock but also for a more "slinky" string tension... wil it work or hurt in the long run?

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Is there any benefit to a 15 deg headstock angle vs a 13 deg headstock angle, or vise versa? what is the minimum useful angle for a guitar headstock and why? Is there a maximum useful angle? I'm thinking of using a smaller angle (13 deg or less) to add a bit of strength to the headstock but also for a more "slinky" string tension... wil it work or hurt in the long run?

Carvin uses 10 deg. So find what you like and be Happy :D)), I wouldn't venture less than than 10deg, but then again I've never tried it (less than 10 deg that is).

Just my .02 cents worth.

Mike

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larger angles create more pressure on the nut, this can make the nut wear quicker, and it also reduces tuning stability, as there is more friction at the nut, letting there be a greater difference in tension between either sides of the nut. people say it increases sustain by having the extra pressure. basically it is a compromise between the tuning stability and sustain. strength isnt too much of an issue if you do a scarf joint, assuming you dont go crazy with the angle. if the wood grains are closer to paralell between the 2 pieces of the scarf joint it should glue better than grain that is closer to perpendicular.

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Is there any benefit to a 15 deg headstock angle vs a 13 deg headstock angle, or vise versa? what is the minimum useful angle for a guitar headstock and why? Is there a maximum useful angle? I'm thinking of using a smaller angle (13 deg or less) to add a bit of strength to the headstock but also for a more "slinky" string tension... wil it work or hurt in the long run?

My scarf joints are 13deg. I find 15 deg too much. I think that Ibanez makes their scarf at 10 deg, but I may be wrong. I think that some of the Norlin era Les Pauls were 13 deg but the purists didn't like that and Gibson went back to 15 deg. Just like when they removed the volutes. Geez, what's so wrong with a volute?

There will be no diff in string tension - that's more to do with scale length and tuning (ie. 440 vs 416 hz ref tone)

Some people say that a steeper angle means more sustain and I don't buy that argument for one minute, especially for fretted notes.

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10 to 15 degrees, seems to be the range for the headstock angle with 13 being the commonest. Between this range you get the optimium gluing surface area, whilst having sufficient downforce on the nut.

Too shallow an angle reduces the pressure on the nut, whereas to much angle reduces the ammount of gluing area, therefore compromising the strength of the joint.

Edited by jaycee
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Here's a related question on this... suppose you have a non locking trem system (PRS, Wilkinson, etc) with a graphite/teflon nut in which the strings are supposed to be able to slightly "slide" and then return to original position...

Would it be better to have *less* of an angle, for less pressure on the nut? Maybe just enough to keep the strings from buzzing, but not much more?

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