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A New Spray Setup


jammy
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For the instruments I've finished so far I've used a professional spray booth at my old college. The time has now come to invest in my own compressor and gun, and sort out a little booth.

I'm looking for quality kit, as It'll have to last! I'll be spraying mainly acid-cat lacquer.

Recommendations please chaps! (I'm UK based, by the way...)

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SATA MiniJet, and as much (oil lubed) compressor you can get. Other compressors will work fine if you just want to shoot paint, but if you are pondering air sanders and the like in the future, don't do the stupid thing like me, and get a proper sized one from the get go. Plus oil and water traps and appropriate tubing.

The SATA's not cheap (about 140 quid/200 euros), but it's an excellent piece of kit, just the right size with the regular tip (not SR), 1.0mm in my case, for spraying guitar-sized objects, and enough fan control to do bursts as well. The Iwata LPH-80 also gets pretty good reviews, and looks like a nice gun. Haven't located it anywhere, though, and since I have a MiniJet already, I figure its purely academic for me.

I heartily reccomend it.

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Cheers for the quick reply Mattia!

I've had a look at the gun - looks nice, and if it's as good as you say, I'm sure it'll be worth the investment. When talking about tips, what is meant by "SR"? The gun is also described as HVLP, which I understand is "high volume low pressure" - great - but how low is low pressure?

Also, with regards to the compressor, are there any specific numbers I should be looking out for? Minimum required CFMs or PSIs?

Thank again

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Cheers for the quick reply Mattia!

I've had a look at the gun - looks nice, and if it's as good as you say, I'm sure it'll be worth the investment. When talking about tips, what is meant by "SR"? The gun is also described as HVLP, which I understand is "high volume low pressure" - great - but how low is low pressure?

Also, with regards to the compressor, are there any specific numbers I should be looking out for? Minimum required CFMs or PSIs?

Thank again

Hello, low pressure means you feed it 40 psi and the gun converts it to 10 psi at the cap where the paint comes out. More paint with less over spray. As for CFM's get as big a compressor as you can afford, the more CFM's the better, a big tank with a 5 or 6 HP motor. Thats if you want to run other air operated equipment with it. I use a 2 HP with a 4 gallon tank, it can hardly keep up with a 1 MM tip HVLP gun. Just my 2 cents.

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Check out the tools you may want to use, and then buy a compressor that delivers more than they need. For the SATA, even a cheap and nasty oilless (like mine) will do the trick (big tank, 1.5hp motor). Activates once every few cycles, but that's with the MiniJet, which isn't a huge volume guzzler. SR means 'spot repair', ie very small fan shape. Great for, well, spot repair, less for spraying entire bodies.

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The chances of me using other tools with this thing are pretty minimal if I'm honest. The spray booth will be a shed about 40 feet from my main workshop, and that's where the compressor will live. I wouldn't want to rule it out totally, but I can't see it happening really.

http://www.machinemart.co.uk/shop/product/...mpressors-elect

how does that look to you chaps? I'm tempted by a Clarke as they often send me "vat free" offers and such things :D

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Before buying a Minijet check out the Iwata Lph-80. I just bought one and its way better than my minijet, atomizes better and uses half the air. Way newer technology from what I've been told. Coast Airbrush price matched mine at $265 with the 1.2 tip.

Also Iwata has way better customer service in my experience.

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Interesting...SATA lays down a great coat, perfectly smooth, barely any leveling needed if you tune it up right, and I my cheap compressor kicks in once every 2 or 3 coats. It's got a big tank, but not much in the way of a motor. I'd guess that SATA doesn't sit still in the R&D department either, so their newest MiniJets are going to be a little more refined than the previous models (I have a 3, and I don't feel the need to upgrade). They do consume more air, though; the Iwata looks like it could run off a pancacke compressor/airbrush compressor.

In terms of customer service, over here in Europe, it's very easy to pick up a phone, talk to one of the SATA customer reps and get useful, insightful, good answers to your questions. Maybe their US distribution network's not up for it, but their home offices work just fine, and were able to advise me more than well enough. Their products are also a little easier to find over here than Iwata's; my preferred non-paint supplies place sells Sata and DeVilbiss guns (Sata being cheaper), and if you need replacement parts, they're easy enough to source.

Still, worth a look, and if the dutch distribution network ever sorts themselves up (the Iwata page has been under construction for months now), and I need a new gun, I'll look into them. Thanks for the tip!

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You can always order from over here.

I agree the Sata is a good tool. In my opinion the Lph-80 does better, but its my dedicated clear gun so I havent run primers or colors or flake through it yet.

Sata has been the standard for mini guns, but a few top painters (Frasier, Ryno) recomended the Lph-80 to me as what they replaced thier Sata's with.

It's all about what you can make work for you, we all paint a little different.

Iwata is way bigger in supporting classes and events here than the other companies. They've been the only company that has ever had the time to talk to a one man shop about equipment and techniques.

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If you're going to use any sort of catalyzing product, you have 2 choices:

1. Prepare to clean the living crap out of your guns constantly, or sooner or later, you will just dispose of your gun and buy a new one.

2. Prepare to clean your gun decently, and also prepare to dispose of the gun sooner or later.

Moral of the story: if you're using a catalyzing finish, prepare to dispose of your gun sooner or later, so don't go buying a super-fancy or super-nice gun, it's not worth it when an average/disposable gun will do just as well and wqon't break your heart when it comes time to can it and buy another one.

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  • 1 month later...
If you're going to use any sort of catalyzing product, you have 2 choices:

1. Prepare to clean the living crap out of your guns constantly, or sooner or later, you will just dispose of your gun and buy a new one.

2. Prepare to clean your gun decently, and also prepare to dispose of the gun sooner or later.

Moral of the story: if you're using a catalyzing finish, prepare to dispose of your gun sooner or later, so don't go buying a super-fancy or super-nice gun, it's not worth it when an average/disposable gun will do just as well and wqon't break your heart when it comes time to can it and buy another one.

If you want a cheap one (I've never tried it so I can't give you any personal reviews) stewmac has one that is fairly inexpensive.

http://www.stewmac.com/shop/Finishing_supp...Spray_Guns.html

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I understand what drak is saying.

But I find my expensive guns easier to clean. However, either way its only a few minutes with some lacquer thinner either way. After a few sessions or if I'm making a drastic color change I will tear the gun down and take maybe fifteen to twenty minutes. I would always want to do this either way to make sure I didn't have contamination etc... I also dedicate a gun to flakes and pearls because they are always hanging out waiting for the wrong moment.

Most pro painters I have talked to have never replaced a gun due to age, or wear.

I can testify having accidentally left some catalyzed Kustom Shop clear in a gun over a week, don't ask, that a little patience and lacquer thinner you can detail a dun to like new status. Not my preference but you do what you have to.

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If you're going to use any sort of catalyzing product, you have 2 choices:

1. Prepare to clean the living crap out of your guns constantly, or sooner or later, you will just dispose of your gun and buy a new one.

2. Prepare to clean your gun decently, and also prepare to dispose of the gun sooner or later.

Moral of the story: if you're using a catalyzing finish, prepare to dispose of your gun sooner or later, so don't go buying a super-fancy or super-nice gun, it's not worth it when an average/disposable gun will do just as well and wqon't break your heart when it comes time to can it and buy another one.

+1

I went with the Grizzly guns. With the conversion varnish I'm using, I prefer to do a complete break-down and cleaning every few hours if I'm shooting continuously. Its only 15 minutes.

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I've owned the same gun for over a decade and have rebuilt it ONCE! It still shoots better than half of the Sata's my buddies have and looks like it is less than a year old. I have sprayed guitars ( and lots of other stuff ) slicker than most people get their stuff AFTER buffing it.

Buy a GOOD gun and TAKE CARE OF IT. My next gun will be an Iwata. Sata's are way overpriced and way overhyped. Get as big a tank on the compressor you can find. Also find a cast iron headed motor with a LOW rpm rating. They last MUCH longer than an aluminium headed compresser runnig over 2500 rpms.

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On the subject of spray setups... what do you guys do for ventilation? I shoot lacquer in the basement workshop and I'm always a little nervous. I have a fan to take the fumes out of the room and hopefully they exhaust fast enough. It seems that I should be using an explosion proof fan. Well, little do I know, I was using a regular fan and the compressor in the same room.

Next time, I'll move the compressor out but for the exhaust fan, the explosion proof ones are extremely expensive. I found these on eBay. What do you think? They're "hazardous location" fans by Emerson. Do you guys think they would be suitable for a spray booth type of application?

Edited by guitar2005
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I have a 7x7x4 mdf box, that uses plastic sheeting for a door. I have cut outs for spray booth filters and have the seems sealed with duct tape after calking them. It does the job of a ghetto spray booth, which is contain odor when I use clears and keep in the overspray. It also minimizes stuff getting in my my clears. It also uses a pretty small footprint, which is important to me with a garage based business.

For a fan I use one I bought at Target. It has a plastic body and fan blades and brushless motor, it is also after my filters.

I understand why an explosion proof rating is important, however I don't see where there is a risk with a brushless motor and plastic parts. You have to research and figure out whats right for you.

Your milage may vary, it is unsafe in the state of california to even read this post.

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