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Gibson 24.75" Scale


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Stew mac sells 24.75" scale fretboards that are actually 24-9/16".

I find this very confusing. When you use the StewMac fret calculator to position the brigde, which scale length do you enter? 24-3/4" or 24-9/16"?

The original Gibson scale was more like 628 mm, which I believe now is referred to Gibson's 'vintage' scale. They later started using the imperial system, which changed the measurements somewhat.

But like Rick says, all of your calculations should be made using the exact fretboard and hardware that will be used on the guitar.

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Gibson's "24.75 inch" scale has changed over the years. Use the actual scale length (24-9/16" in your case), not the nominal scale length, to calculate positions.

No...You use the 24.75" bridge position...it is supposed to "compensate" for the streching of the string that happens when you fret.That is the theory anyway...I don't know how well it works,because on the few guitars I built with those boards at that scale,after adjusting the saddles for intonation I always wondered if there was any difference at all.

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Gibson's "24.75 inch" scale has changed over the years. Use the actual scale length (24-9/16" in your case), not the nominal scale length, to calculate positions.

No...You use the 24.75" bridge position...it is supposed to "compensate" for the streching of the string that happens when you fret.That is the theory anyway...I don't know how well it works,because on the few guitars I built with those boards at that scale,after adjusting the saddles for intonation I always wondered if there was any difference at all.

On an acoustic or archtop guitar I could understand but do I really need to compensate on a metal shredding machine with low action? Arghghgh! I just want to drill the stupid post holes right now.

Edited by guitar2005
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Here's a trick that I used with a tunomatic install to get in the zone insofar as intonation is concerned. I first measured off and installed the tailpiece. Then I jigged up the bridge with shims and strung up the two E strings and the G string. Ensure that the shims don't block the post holes down to the top of the guitar. I didn't have the pickups installed yet, so I used a tuner with a built in mic, set it by the string as close as I could, and then tuned up to pitch. With all the saddles to center and then set intonation for these three strings by moving the bridge itself. Once everything was OK on the tuner, used a transfer punch to mark where to drill. It's common to see Gibby's with the bridge a bit of parralel offset in relation to the tailpiece. I guess it saves from using up all the saddle travel on one end or the other of the bridge. Used basically the same procedure for a hardtail install, only difference was that I had to clamp the hardtail.

I know it may sound a little hokey, but it worked for me. Hope it helps.

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Arghghgh! I just want to drill the stupid post holes right now.

Since this is one of the most important steps in building a guitar, it makes sense to take your time here.

First, I wouldn't drill anything until you have all of the parts in hand.

Stewmac's calculator is really nice and all, but it only works if you're using exactly the same bridge as they're calculating for. You have to drill your holes according to what you actually have.

In my case, I used a vintage scale fretboard and a non-compensated wraparound bridge. I set the bridge so that the ridge for the High E was exactly at the intonation point, with a couple of millimeters of forward action, just in case.

Importantly, I used a pair of laser guides to position the bridge relative to the nut --that is, the outer slots for the E strings.

The result is a guitar that is surprisingly intonated (given the lack of possibility for compensation other than the forward/backward motion of the two sides of the bridge).

A wraparound tailpiece is usually set straight. A TOM-style bridge section is normally set at an angle, with the bass side set backward.

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Arghghgh! I just want to drill the stupid post holes right now.

Since this is one of the most important steps in building a guitar, it makes sense to take your time here.

First, I wouldn't drill anything until you have all of the parts in hand.

Stewmac's calculator is really nice and all, but it only works if you're using exactly the same bridge as they're calculating for. You have to drill your holes according to what you actually have.

In my case, I used a vintage scale fretboard and a non-compensated wraparound bridge. I set the bridge so that the ridge for the High E was exactly at the intonation point, with a couple of millimeters of forward action, just in case.

Importantly, I used a pair of laser guides to position the bridge relative to the nut --that is, the outer slots for the E strings.

The result is a guitar that is surprisingly intonated (given the lack of possibility for compensation other than the forward/backward motion of the two sides of the bridge).

A wraparound tailpiece is usually set straight. A TOM-style bridge section is normally set at an angle, with the bass side set backward.

spot on.

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I use my stainless ruler from stewmac for the side to side lineup...I don't have lasers.

guitar2005...you can set it up either way...you can use the 24 9/16" mark for the high E post and it will be fine.I think the 24.75" compensation thing is closer to "hoodoo" than actual reality.

My last post is just based on the "theory" by Gibson....In actual practice,the saddles end up in the same place anyway.

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Arghghgh! I just want to drill the stupid post holes right now.

Since this is one of the most important steps in building a guitar, it makes sense to take your time here.

First, I wouldn't drill anything until you have all of the parts in hand.

Stewmac's calculator is really nice and all, but it only works if you're using exactly the same bridge as they're calculating for. You have to drill your holes according to what you actually have.

Yup - I have all the parts in hand, ready to go. The Gotoh bridge I have is from stew mac and it is listed in the fret position calculator, along with the ABR and other TOM bridges.

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In my case, I used a vintage scale fretboard and a non-compensated wraparound bridge. I set the bridge so that the ridge for the High E was exactly at the intonation point, with a couple of millimeters of forward action, just in case.

Ok - is that the bridge without adjustable saddles? If so, I could understand using the 24-3/4" scale with a 2-9/16" fretboard.

I'm using a TOM with adjustable saddles.

A wraparound tailpiece is usually set straight. A TOM-style bridge section is normally set at an angle, with the bass side set backward.

Yup - I knew that much. I'm going with string through and ferrules.

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In my case, I used a vintage scale fretboard and a non-compensated wraparound bridge. I set the bridge so that the ridge for the High E was exactly at the intonation point, with a couple of millimeters of forward action, just in case.

Ok - is that the bridge without adjustable saddles? If so, I could understand using the 24-3/4" scale with a 2-9/16" fretboard.

I'm using a TOM with adjustable saddles.

Yeah, it's an all-in-one bridge, that is, it functions as bridge and tailpiece. Means it has adjuster screws to move it backward and forward, which most TOMs don't have. But like I said, the scale I used was based on my measurement of the fretboard itself --I appreciate that the board is supposed to have a certain scale and all, but I prefer to verify it with my own measurements.

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