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Brass Nuts


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if you want something ideal for a tremolo, try GraphTech's Trem-Nuts, they're suppose to be VERY SLIPPERY. I don't really use tremolos but I do have their string retainers on one of my guitars to lessen my string breakage from tuning.

And as for compensated nuts, i'm not sure what effect would they have, besides having an effect on intonation (good or bad, depending on your overall setup).

:D

edit: just realized, the compensated nut would only have an effect on your string intonation played open, but in most cases, just the regular intonation treatment (via saddles) should be good enough.

Edited by ~davie
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the compensated nut would only have an effect on your string intonation played open

This is a common misconception. What you are doing is shortening the length to all frets under the string that is compensated. Even if you capo the first fret, its still flattened the compensated amount for each string. The whole point is to better intonate the frets towards the nut. Open, you can tune the string anyway you like. Compensation doesn't effect that.

Edited by Mr Alex
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the compensated nut would only have an effect on your string intonation played open

This is a common misconception. What you are doing is shortening the length to all frets under the string that is compensated. Even if you capo the first fret, its still flattened the compensated amount for each string. The whole point is to better intonate the frets towards the nut. Open, you can tune the string anyway you like. Compensation doesn't effect that.

are you sure? if you actually capo the 1st fret or any other fret you're actually taking the distance of the fret in reference to the saddles, and basically anything before the capo is negated. It's common sense that the compensated nut only affects the open notes. And as for intonation, the nut is made to compensate the tuning of the opened string relative to all the other frets where necessary to balance the intonations of all your frets as close as possible. IMO, the compensated nut is more trouble than its worth. :D

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are you sure? if you actually capo the 1st fret or any other fret you're actually taking the distance of the fret in reference to the saddles, and basically anything before the capo is negated. It's common sense that the compensated nut only affects the open notes. And as for intonation, the nut is made to compensate the tuning of the opened string relative to all the other frets where necessary to balance the intonations of all your frets as close as possible. IMO, the compensated nut is more trouble than its worth. :D

The compensated nut does nothing to open notes, they are what you tuned the string to. If you compensate at the bridge, it doesn't effect the open notes either. You are only changing the string length relative to the frets. The nut compensates the fretted strings, relative to the open notes. If you use high nut action, you need to shift the nut closer to the first fret, or it will play sharp, especially at the frets closest to the nut. The point of compensating each string individually at the nut, is to get is as perfect as possible. There is no way it will be totally perfect though, and yes they can be more trouble than they are worth, but for some people they are a necessity.

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