Jump to content

Ideal Temperatuture Conditions To Paint


deeboy
 Share

Recommended Posts

I am embarking on my first refinishing project soon. I plan on priming and using either duplicolor or plasti-kote spray cans to finish the body in my garage. I live in NY and the temperature is dropping day by day. The good thing (I think) is that as the winter approaches, there will be less humidity in the air. Is it safe to prime, paint, clear, and allow to dry in my garage? Am I better off spraying in my garage and bringing it indoors to dry or should I wait till the Spring to avoid potential laquer cracking issues?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Usually 70 degrees is a good minimum cure temperture. But I am in the same kind of pinch right now. I don't have anywhere inside my house to spray, so I have to spray outside, but in Pa. we have been running in the low 50's or lower lately. So I have a spare bedroom that is in shambles right now, so I use that as my drying room. It stays warm in there and I added two oil filled radiators to keep the temp up, and then run a fan on low to draw the fumes out. I've been taking the body outside for the minute or two it takes to lay down the coat and then run it inside. Th fan draws the fumes out well enough that you don't even smell anything right outside that room.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I live in MD where it rarely gets below 40 during the day in the winter, and my garage usually checks in in the 50s. I still won't finish in the garage that cold, I wait until the temperature is above 70F.

Best thing you can do.....concentrate on the woodworking during the winter, and finish like a madman the rest of the time.

On the other hand, oil finsihes like Tru Oil can be done in the house among the wife and kids, any time of year, and no one will choke from the fumes (there are none).

Edited by erikbojerik
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I will absolutely agree with Wes and Erik, and that is, unless you're professionally prepared, the answer is that you DON'T apply spray finishes in the winter, unless you like to strip and refinish guitars a lot.

Wes is 100% correct, if you shoot it cold and move it indoors, you will sadly regret the day you did that, because you will one day be stripping and refinishing it ALL OVER AGAIN. :D

So sorry the answer is not the one you wanted, but it is the correct one, especially for your first project.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

i recently read an article in american woodworker of a guy who built a curing cabinet out of plywood and used incandescent bulbs to heat. He also installed a thermostat like the one you would put in your car to regulate. it apparently heated the box to around 125 F. I don't know much more about this but i plan on researching this for finishing in my garage. i don't know if this will solve any of the problems of finishing in the winter but i figure it is a start. Please correct me if you know anything beyond this. good luck.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...