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How do you shape the neck to be "fast"


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man you know ,"fast"=thin is a mistake.it depends on your hand size.i just pulled something in my hand for the first time in 13 years of playing...all because i was on a neck that was too thin for my hand size.large hands=large neck.what makes a neck fast is having the action set up right and having the right finish on it...natural or oiled necks feel best to me.

but to answer your question you can shape it any way you want to...i used sandpaper to shape my first one...on coen's suggestion.

the wizard necks use jumbo frets.

by the way the wizard 2 is better than the wizard imo...it is a little thicker

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.large hands=large neck.what makes a neck fast is having the action set up right and having the right finish on it...natural or oiled necks feel best to me.

as per vai, he likes the the wizard 2 which is basicaly the Jem neck just a tad wider at the upper frets. and EJ that plays stock fender necks, some with a flatter radius and jumbo's........ both of them have pretty long and dangly fingers

but wouldn't that mean a person with smaller hands should go for the original wizard neck? or just play a thinner neck like 42-56 instead of 43-57

ebony doesn't seem like a bad choice (for fingerboards) cause it can be sanded to a mirror, althought there are cheaper woods that are very similar in tone

... ya i use a spokeshave all the time, great little tool

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but wouldn't that mean a person with smaller hands should go for the original wizard neck? or just play a thinner neck like 42-56 instead of 43-57

Not necessarily, my wife's fingers are shorter by the length of one knuckle than mine and she can barely reach the low strings on a guitar with a wizrd neck (forget it if that guitar has 7 strings). She does best with a thin/narrow neck. Me, I do better with a wide, fat neck. It really is what you're comfortable with.

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isn't that what i said? small hands = small neck?

Actually what you said was:

"but wouldn't that mean a person with smaller hands should go for the original wizard neck? or just play a *THINNER* neck like 42-56 instead of 43-57" (emphasis mine).

I was stating that they might want a narrower neck as well, possibly even moreso as my wife does better with a thick/narrow than a wide/thin neck.

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For whoever is confused with what GEJ just said, picture the neck when you look at it from the body (or the headstock, doesn't matter that much but since we're talking the higher frets, it makes sense to consider it from the body side), with the fretboard pointing to the sky. Than you'd have something like this:

^

| thick/thin

<-wide/narrow ->

|thick/thin

v

umm...okay, thinking about it...I hope that's not even more confusing. What I mean to say is, that thick/thin refers to the distance between the fretboard and the back of the neck and wide/narrow refers to the size of the fretboard from the edge that points towards your nose when you play and the one that points toward the ground.

so long

ace

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Well, Hagstrom is said to have the "fastest" neck around. My Hagstrom III measures 1 9/16" across the nut. Its also a very shallow neck. They can only get away with stability in such a slim neck because the trussrod they use has little wings along each side. I can't say as much for the action, those guitars can be difficult to set up for really low action. They have a very primitive style TOM bridge.

I would have to agree about the definition of a "fast" neck having low action but I guess string spacing would play a part as well. I'm not sure fret size has anything to do with it.

Shaping a neck can be real fun. The important part is getting the initial rough in done properly. Set the blade depth shallow (around 1/32") on your spoke shave and make sure the blade is really sharp. Dull blades will wreck the wood in no time by grabbing chunks out. As long as what you start with is straight then its no problem so long as material is removed evenly. Otherwise you have to work out the high areas first until its all level. I run a spoke shave down the entire length and check it now and then with a straightedge. When you have it roughed in you run the entire length with 80 grit sandpaper, still checking with a straightedge. Just keep going until the neck feels right to you, thats all. When you start to see truss rod ...ya better stop , :D. After that you can use finer sandpaper for smoothing.

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