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Remove Inlays revisited


jbkim
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At the other extreme of the resent inlay posts (beautiful work, btw!) I'm curious to the feasibility of removing pre-existing dot marker inlays and filling the holes cleanly... achieving this look:

BOLT.jpg

I found this thread on removing them. Any suggestions on how/what to fill them with on an ebony fretboard? Has anyone done this? I'm planing on re-radiusing the fretboard so I'll be sure to save the ebony dust.

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When I first played my guitar project I got lost right away.  I couldn't believe how much I depended on those fretboard dots!  So I took a 1-hole paper punch and made some temporary ones out of sticky backed label paper.  Until I get good at cutting and setting abalone.

Heh :D. I started on Classical guitar so I'm used to no markers... not even side markers. But for electric, I like the side markers... never use the inlay markers on the front for navigation. I don't know, I think it looks kinda cool without any dots. Kinda stealth, eh? B)

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So you wanna show off "hey, I'm good enough to play without fretboard markers. I could even play all of this with my eyes closed"

J/K :D

Serisously though, build a new neck and don't mark the fretboard. IN that case you don't wind up destroying an otherwise perfectly good neck if you mess up removing the inlays.

so long

ace

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So you wanna show off "hey, I'm good enough to play without fretboard markers. I could even play all of this with my eyes closed"

J/K  :D

Heh, ulterior motives B). Humans are very visual creatures, men even more so than women... but music is about sound in which case the markers are like crutches. I tell my students to try not to look at the fretboard when playing... assuring them that the frets have not moved since the last time they looked :D. Well, anyway, I did say I liked the side markers in a previous post. They're there if/when I'd need them.

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I would drill the dots out, then cut actual ebony pieces the size of dots and inlay then into the holes. Use CA with ebony dust to fill the gaps if any.

That way you still get the actual wood look. Glue or filler of any kind will look off.

Matching up the wood's grain can only help as well.

Don't try to cheat your way out of it with filler. You won't be happy.

My 2 cents.

Craig

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Find a piece of copper or brass tube, inside dia. = dia. of hole to be filled, and notch teeth into one end with a hacksaw. It should just fit a 3/8" drill chuck. Cut your plugs in the face of the wood and put a piece of masking tape over all the little wood circles. Then cut the back (with the grain) to the thickness you need. The plugs will stick to the tape as you peel the tape off.

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  • 2 weeks later...
I'm thinking even if the ebony plugs aren't invisible, it might have a cool black on black effect.

I gave the dots three coats of black Sharpie maker :D to get an idea of how it'd look. I did it on a cheapo steinberger with a dark (dyed?) rosewood fingerboard. It doesn't look that bad! At certain angles, it's invisible... other angles it looks shiny. Well, anyway, it's given me more impetus to try ebony plugs on an ebony board.

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