Jump to content

"wet Look" Oil Finish


DGW
 Share

Recommended Posts

I'm looking for any information that may help me achieve a "wet look" oil finish.

I'm working with a padauk body ...

All I've done so far is prep it and give it a good coat of danish oil.

I read another in another thread to use 600 grit sanpaper to sand in the danish oil, so that's what I did.

I was going to just finish it up with beeswax, but I'm not sure that will give me the shiney look I'm going for.

Any and all suggestions welcome.

DSC09997a.jpg

*edit*

This is the look I'm basically looking for (still wet with danish oil) ...

DSC00029a.jpg

Thanks! :D

Edited by DGW
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Tru-oil will achieve a much glossier look than danish oil.

Hmmm ....

Will it remain oily? :D

And will it offer any sort of "protection".

How would you recommend I apply it?

Just rub it into the finish?

Can I do this over the danish oil?

Thanks Jon. :D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have no experience applying an oil over an oil, but my guess is that it should be just fine applying tru-oil over danish oil. Always test on scrap first to be positive that what your finishes are compatible with each other.

No, it wont remain oily. It dries pretty hard for a simple oil varnish, but it doesn't compare to lacquer or polyurethane type finishes. I don't know if I'd say it offers any kind of protection. My 6-string has already had a couple small dents and dings and it doesn't look like the tru-oil prevented any kind of damage. I strongly recommend you cut up an old cloth shirt and apply tru-oil with it, that's about the most consistent results you'll get by hand.

Here's a couple instruments I've finished with tru-oil.

6-string%20Fretted%2015.JPG_IbanezSR4063.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I strongly recommend you cut up an old cloth shirt and apply tru-oil with it, that's about the most consistent results you'll get by hand.

Is there any other way except "by hand" to get better results?

I have equipment, buffers, etc ...

Awesome bass btw. :D

Edited by DGW
Link to comment
Share on other sites

You can get a very shiny finish with tru oil if you're willing to apply a number of coats, and use micro mesh sanding papers on it. This neck was finished with about 20 coats of tru oil (lightly buffed between every 2 coats with 0000 wire wool wet with naptha), and dry sanded up to 12000 grit with micro mesh papers.

neckpolished1.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You can get a very shiny finish with tru oil if you're willing to apply a number of coats, and use micro mesh sanding papers on it. This neck was finished with about 20 coats of tru oil (lightly buffed between every 2 coats with 0000 wire wool wet with naptha), and dry sanded up to 12000 grit with micro mesh papers.

neckpolished1.jpg

HOLY CRAP!!! .... THAT'S INCREDIBLE!!!! :D

Okay ... I'm sold.

So where's the best place to find Tru oil?

BTW ... did you really mean 12000 grit? Or 1200 grit?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've purchased tru oil from woodcraft online, but many wal marts and gun stores also carry it. BTW, it's very easy to apply by hand, using a t-shirt like Jon said.

And yes, 12000 grit was correct. Micro mesh papers are rated on a different scale than the ordinary sandpaper you find in a hardware store. I also purchased the micro mesh from woodcraft. A lot of guys on here have had great success with it on a number of different finishes. Personally I prefer using it dry rather than wet.

Good luck, let us know if you have any more questions!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Tru Oil is a great finish. It is not a super hard finish, but does offer more protection than just an oil.

This lap steel I built has more coats than I can remember, but came out great.

Final coats were let to cure for a couple weeks then rubbed out with Birchwood Caseys Stock and Sheen conditioner, kind of a pumice / rottenstone type grit in a liquid vehicle.

Higher res pic here http://i54.photobucket.com/albums/g94/quar...close1-1024.jpg

.

close1-600.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Tru-oil will definitely get you a glossier finish. If you would decide to stick with the danish oil, I would look at using paste wax instead of beeswax. Paste wax has a higher melting temperature, and therefore is harder than beeswax. The harder the wax you apply, the glossier a result you will achieve.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well, I decided to go with Tru Oil ...

I've only applied a few coats so far, but it's looking really good.

I'm using naptha and 0000 steel wool between coats.

Once I get all the grain completely sealed, I'll start with the micro mesh.

My question is ...

Would it be a good idea to use the naptha with the micro mesh? Or dry sand?

As fine as micro mesh is, I'm thinking that sanding it dry will gunk up the paper really quick.

Also ... is there something I should use over the finish, such as a compound of some sort, to really bring out the shine?

Thanks!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Micro Mesh works great sanding dry. Strangely enough I had a lot more luck with it that way than when using it wet. I'd suggest doing it dry.

Also, make sure to keep doing a number of coats after the grain is filled.

As far as something to bring out the shine, the micro mesh will do that plenty well, but you might be able to use a polishing compound on it as well after you use the micro mesh. I don't really think you'll need to, however.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Tru Oil is a great finish. It is not a super hard finish, but does offer more protection than just an oil.

This lap steel I built has more coats than I can remember, but came out great.

Final coats were let to cure for a couple weeks then rubbed out with Birchwood Caseys Stock and Sheen conditioner, kind of a pumice / rottenstone type grit in a liquid vehicle.

Higher res pic here http://i54.photobucket.com/albums/g94/quar...close1-1024.jpg

.

close1-600.jpg

Wow! Going OT for a moment: please tell me how you made those inlays? They're spectactular! What kind of metal is around the abalone?

And back ON topic: I'm following this thread with great interest as well. Here's my question:

My neck has a centre laminate of bubinga, sandwiched between two laminates of maple - the maple isn't going to be a problem, but the bubinga has a much more open grain, so: how do I seal it? Just keep applying more and more coats of TruOil? Will the bubinga grain eventually fill, or do I need some form of additional sealer?

At the moment the neck is dry sanded, and has had nothing added to it, just lots of sanding!

Thanks,

DJ

Link to comment
Share on other sites

[My neck has a centre laminate of bubinga, sandwiched between two laminates of maple - the maple isn't going to be a problem, but the bubinga has a much more open grain, so: how do I seal it? Just keep applying more and more coats of TruOil? Will the bubinga grain eventually fill, or do I need some form of additional sealer?

I had a maple/walnut/maple sandwich on the neck that I posted earlier in the thread. The walnut filled just fine with only tru oil, given enough coats.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

[My neck has a centre laminate of bubinga, sandwiched between two laminates of maple - the maple isn't going to be a problem, but the bubinga has a much more open grain, so: how do I seal it? Just keep applying more and more coats of TruOil? Will the bubinga grain eventually fill, or do I need some form of additional sealer?

I had a maple/walnut/maple sandwich on the neck that I posted earlier in the thread. The walnut filled just fine with only tru oil, given enough coats.

Yeah, that neck looks fantastic too! Thanks for that!!

DJ

Link to comment
Share on other sites

... Wow! Going OT for a moment: please tell me how you made those inlays? They're spectactular! What kind of metal is around the abalone? ...

Thanks .. the fret markers are .032 sheet aluminum and the bezels for the dots is 9/32 aluminum tubing from the hobby store.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

[My neck has a centre laminate of bubinga, sandwiched between two laminates of maple - the maple isn't going to be a problem, but the bubinga has a much more open grain, so: how do I seal it? Just keep applying more and more coats of TruOil? Will the bubinga grain eventually fill, or do I need some form of additional sealer?

I had a maple/walnut/maple sandwich on the neck that I posted earlier in the thread. The walnut filled just fine with only tru oil, given enough coats.

What about the Sealer&Filler from Birchwood Casey? I'm planning using

TruOil in my mahogany guitar project and I was thinking if this filler and

sealer is a good idea for this open grained wood instead of applying lot

of coats of TruOil? It's my first TruOil finish process an I'm not very

confident :D

Edited by Jorge Fernandez
Link to comment
Share on other sites

...What about the Sealer&Filler from Birchwood Casey? ...

I'm going to give their sealer / filler a try on a walnut project I'm finishing up.

I've had great luck with just Tru Oil and wet sanding, but I'm anxious to see if their sealer / filler is easier or faster.

With any luck, I should be starting the finish in a few days.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

...What about the Sealer&Filler from Birchwood Casey? ...

I'm going to give their sealer / filler a try on a walnut project I'm finishing up.

I've had great luck with just Tru Oil and wet sanding, but I'm anxious to see if their sealer / filler is easier or faster.

With any luck, I should be starting the finish in a few days.

Great! I'm very interested. I'm in the sanding stage. Then I'll do some test on scrap

wood but any information is welcome. I'll looking for your posts :D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...