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My First Build.


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So yeah, here's an update for you:

I finally got some actual work done on the thing this time around. I had some trouble the other time around when I wanted to bandsaw the thing up; over my vacation, the big part of the board started to bow, so I had to cut that in half and then re-glue them and wait overnight.

Today though, I finally some work done.

The body, glue unscraped.

S7300999.jpg

Some form of a guitar takes place.

S7301000.jpg

More work will be done on friday. I'm not sure whether i should have sawed to the line on the body or if I should sand down to that. Either way. I'll figure it out from UG.

Yeah, that's how far I got. Now, I've got a question. I've seen a lot of people just do a rough cut on a bandsaw and then somehow get it down to the final size of the guitar. How the hell should I go about doing that? Haha, people have said i should use a jigsaw, others have said I should make an MDF template and then route it, but I don't want to do that. Can anyone give me a hand?

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Well; if you don't want to do it the right way you could always buy alot of sand paper and form the final edges by hand.

I make templates and use a router. Simple, quick and easy to make multiple guitars with the same dimensions. There are only so many ways to skin a cat and the two ways that have been suggested to you are the most cost effective and logical ways of doing it.

Some use belt sanders in conjunctions with spindle sanders but that's more equipment intensive. A low cost Ryobi router will get the job done in no time.

These threads that ask "how do I get around doing it the right way" or "how do I reinvent the wheel" really get lost on me, sorry.

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Well; if you don't want to do it the right way you could always buy alot of sand paper and form the final edges by hand.

I make templates and use a router. Simple, quick and easy to make multiple guitars with the same dimensions. There are only so many ways to skin a cat and the two ways that have been suggested to you are the most cost effective and logical ways of doing it.

Some use belt sanders in conjunctions with spindle sanders but that's more equipment intensive. A low cost Ryobi router will get the job done in no time.

These threads that ask "how do I get around doing it the right way" or "how do I reinvent the wheel" really get lost on me, sorry.

well... maybe I'll just go with a more accurate bandsaw next time... there's a dewalt one in there for some really accurate cuts that would be good to use.

who knows, maybe I'll make a template on friday.

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RGman is right on, the first one I made I did as you have, then used a sanding drum chucked in a drill press along with a belt sander and files, rasps and whatever else I could to remove the rest of the wood. What a pain in the arse. Then on my 2nd gitar I listened to the advice here and made a 1/4'' thick template (boy was that easier to shape) and stuck it to my rough cut body with dbl sided tape, a quick trim with the router using a pattern bit and what a pleasure. Done in no time and the template hangs on the wall ready to make another one. Definitly worth doing. -Vinny

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Yeah, see, I don't think I'm gonna end up making another guitar, so making a template, to me, would be kinda pointless.

also,

I know it's too late, but you should have left the horns uncut until you routed out the neck cavity (I'm assuming a bolt-on neck). Gives you more meat for the base of the router. If you still have the parts you cut away, save them and put them back in place when you go to rout. If you do that, don't sand down the body yet as it will tip the router slightly and your pocket won't have a flat seat and you'll have a hell of a time trying to right it. Also, it doesn't look like you left enough meat for the neck. You may have to seat that neck deep into the body.

^someone from UG. the bolded part is my biggest concern. Will that be a problem? i figure I could always make the neck pocket and then find where I should be placing my bridge.

Yeah, i'm a noob guitar maker.

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Yeah, see, I don't think I'm gonna end up making another guitar, so making a template, to me, would be kinda pointless.

Doesn't matter, if your making a one off you would want to build a guitar which was much better than you could buy off the shelf.

Means no shortcuts.

Plus, you will be addicted anyway after your first.

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And do not use a jig saw, they wander and can create a big headache

I disagree, I've used a jig saw with no problems at all. However, the band saw is a better option, since it's much simpler and quicker.

Yeah, see, I don't think I'm gonna end up making another guitar, so making a template, to me, would be kinda pointless.

also,

I know it's too late, but you should have left the horns uncut until you routed out the neck cavity (I'm assuming a bolt-on neck). Gives you more meat for the base of the router. If you still have the parts you cut away, save them and put them back in place when you go to rout. If you do that, don't sand down the body yet as it will tip the router slightly and your pocket won't have a flat seat and you'll have a hell of a time trying to right it. Also, it doesn't look like you left enough meat for the neck. You may have to seat that neck deep into the body.

^someone from UG. the bolded part is my biggest concern. Will that be a problem? i figure I could always make the neck pocket and then find where I should be placing my bridge.

Yeah, i'm a noob guitar maker.

Yeah, you'll be alright. Just make the neck (and neck pocket) and then figure out bridge placement.

CMA

Edited by CrazyManAndy
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Yeah, see, I don't think I'm gonna end up making another guitar, so making a template, to me, would be kinda pointless.

whenever I`m making a one off guitar I saw very close the line on the band saw, and then finish shaping with the robosander (with the advantage of avoiding tearouts).

As a matter of fact, I just realized that I haven`t used my router for shaping bodies in a long time. lol.

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Honestly, MDF is dirt cheap, your template can double as a clamping caul or whatever during the build, and a body-sized piece is large enough you can use it for something else later.

Even if you're only making one guitar, I can make a template and then use that to route the body in less time than it would to make an acceptable body without a template. A routed body edge following a template will just need a bit of finish sanding - trying to clean up after a saw, unless you bandsaw it perfectly, is going to take a heck of a long time. Longer than cleaning up the edges of a template.

You can do it both ways. Heck, I've cut bodies out with a coping saw, by hand. But it's more work than you need to do. I thought I'd save time going template-less on my first build. The second time round, I went with a template, and boy was I amazed at the amount of work I saved.

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Yeah, see, I don't think I'm gonna end up making another guitar, so making a template, to me, would be kinda pointless.

Doesn't matter, if your making a one off you would want to build a guitar which was much better than you could buy off the shelf.

Means no shortcuts.

Plus, you will be addicted anyway after your first.

Haha, yeaaah, I barely have enough money to make this guitar as it is. so we'll see about making another one. Haha.

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You should be much much closer than that line after it comes off the bandsaw. I get it within a few mm of final than either spindal sand the rest or route with a template like suggested.

+1

In my own VERY limited experience, I agree completely. If you are spindle sanding, you need the absolute minimum of excess wood, otherwise it's just much more work. If you are going to route to a template, the less excess you have, the less likely you are to get tearout. Go on, ask me how I know?

Denis

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I have a bandsaw which is next to useless and i used a spokeshave to get from a similar point to a finished outline it was actually quite good fun for a one off guitar build I'd think it's probably quite a good way to go. thats what people were using way before electrickery after all!

Edited by joshvegas
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