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finishing


tonzjonz
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I did a simlar finish before. The Mahogany body does have deep grain. First paint step after prep. Shoot the body black. Get a good solid build (I recommend lacquer). Next, shoot a light coat of red, shooting a bit heavier where you see deep grain. Using 600-800 grit, sand the red off with a block. Stop when you see black, you don't wanna cut through that. When all the red is gone off the higher flat spots, you'll have red deep in the grain. Clean up and shoot clear. Looks like the Voodoo finish was not buffed out, kinda satin gloss.

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WoW.

Never seen one of those before.

Very Cool!

Thanks for the pics Alex.

I've had a very wide board (14") of Northern (baseball bat) Ash here for awhile now, I keep looking at it wondering what to do with it, this looks like a pretty cool way to go.

This place rocks. :D

Where's Blade? I'd bet he'd have some more info on this.

Uhhh... RODNEY!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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Drak- I think Brian pretty well nailed it. It definetly looks like a base color coat and then red tinted grain filler.

If you want to try that route on a sample piece it would be cool to see it.

Here's a grain filler tip for you. Instead of using naptha or mineral spirits to clean it off (you can pull some filler out of the grain and possibly take the black with it)

While it's still drying wipe the excess off with burlap. That stuff will take it right off and won't damage the paint under it or scratch the surface. Works wonders.

So grab some filler and red dye and show us what ya get! :D

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What's throwing me is that usually you do dark grain filler first, which highlights the grain darker than the surrounding wood, then do a lighter color over top, usually as a shader/toner coat. I have an Ash Gary Levinson Blade Tele done like this, the Ash is black (grain-filled) showing under midnight blue toner coat. So the grain is black, the rest is blue.

This seems to be the exact opposite, a negative image of that approach. I'm wondering how you get the grain lighter than the rest. It's got me slightly baffled.

A neat trick.

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