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Custom Miter Box For Neck Scarf


dpm99
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I've been thinking about this since last night, and I can't figure out how to do it. I want to make sure I get the angle right for my neck scarf, and I'm working with very minimal tools. Budget is running short, though I fortunately have planned carefully, and already have (or will have) almost everything I need. Anyway, I was thinking that if I improvise a miter box specifically for the neck scarf, I'll be less likely to make a mistake. I don't really even have to build the whole box. If I get the two sides cut correctly, I can clamp them to either side of the neck and start cutting.

Here's the problem. There's a guy at Home Depot on Saturdays and Sundays that will do miter cuts for free, but I can't figure out how to cut to a sharp enough angle. If I tell him to cut at 15 degrees, it will look like Figure A below. (That's nowhere near precise. I just threw it together on paint for illustration.) I really need a cut that's...what...75 degrees or something? But he won't be able to cut that for me.

ScarfAngle.jpg

I'm not opposed to cutting it myself, but it will be with a hand saw, and I'm worried about not getting it precise. Still, better to have to redo that than to redo the neck. Does anyone know of an easy solution I'm overlooking?

Thanks,

Dave

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I tried the miter box thing for cutting scarfs and its not precise because the blade will have a tendancy to wander a little, regardless of which miter saw you use.

Have you thought of building a router jig? I built mine and I'll be using it on my next build. You do have a router, don't you?

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I've got a router. I'd have no idea what that jig would look like, but I assume someone's got a picture of one posted somewhere. When you did you miter box, did you build the whole box? My thought is that if you leave off the bottom part, and just have two independent sides that you clamp to a center board, it shouldn't wander much. I've never seen anybody do that before, but I don't know why it wouldn't work, if you line up the two sides correctly with a saw.

I'm all for the router jig. If you have plans, I'd love to see what you've got!

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I've got a router. I'd have no idea what that jig would look like, but I assume someone's got a picture of one posted somewhere. When you did you miter box, did you build the whole box? My thought is that if you leave off the bottom part, and just have two independent sides that you clamp to a center board, it shouldn't wander much. I've never seen anybody do that before, but I don't know why it wouldn't work, if you line up the two sides correctly with a saw.

I'm all for the router jig. If you have plans, I'd love to see what you've got!

The router jig is the best Idea, even the nicest smoothest handsaw cut won't be smooth enough to join. Cut the neck roughly at the angle you want, then stick one piece on top of the other, so the angled part on both makes one continuous slope.

Then the jig you want is a flat piece of something like MDF that sticks to the bottom of the neck blank. Then cut two angled pieces (to the angle you want) and stick them to the sides of that base, to give a slope that the router base can run along. I'll draw a picture if you can't get it from that.

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I've got a router. I'd have no idea what that jig would look like, but I assume someone's got a picture of one posted somewhere. When you did you miter box, did you build the whole box? My thought is that if you leave off the bottom part, and just have two independent sides that you clamp to a center board, it shouldn't wander much. I've never seen anybody do that before, but I don't know why it wouldn't work, if you line up the two sides correctly with a saw.

I'm all for the router jig. If you have plans, I'd love to see what you've got!

Hey, I'll take a picture of mine when I have a minute or two.

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Thanks guys. I understand what to do for the router jig. Seems simple enough. Maybe this is a silly question, but if I'm gonna rough cut it and smooth it out, couldn't I just stack it up like this and use a plane with sandpaper on the bottom to sand it?

stack.jpg

It seems like a simpler solution, and at least as effective as the router jig.

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I actually hand cut the scarf and used the plane with the piece aligned just like that. Just stuck them in a vise nice and snug, got my plane blade amazingly sharp and was very careful. I don't even think I had to sand at all afterward, but I'd imagine sandpaper on a plane would work fine as well. I find always having a scraper handy is helpful, as they tend to offer a better gluing joint I believe over sandpaper. So, if I sanded instead of using the plane, I might lightly scrape before gluing. Rockler has a couple types and a burnisher if you want one. They actually shave a lot of time off sanding I find(pun intended). J

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I use that exact same jig, Jon only I use clear Perspex sheet and rod because I love the stuff :-D

You can use a bandsaw and fence to carry out the initial angle cut, before cleaning up with the router jig above by using the router jig as an angled shim between the neck blank and the fence if you have a deep depth of cut.

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I use that exact same jig, Jon only I use clear Perspex sheet and rod because I love the stuff :-D

I'm no engineer, I'll probably be rebuilding a few of my jigs a second and third time before I get them down properly. :D

With this one, the base of the jig should extended outward and the angled part should set on top. Then there should be supports along the sides so there wont be as much flex. I have an instrument sitting behind me with about 270 pounds of string tension that I used the jig on. Success!

8-String%20Fretted%207.JPG

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I use that exact same jig, Jon only I use clear Perspex sheet and rod because I love the stuff :-D

I'm no engineer, I'll probably be rebuilding a few of my jigs a second and third time before I get them down properly. :D

With this one, the base of the jig should extended outward and the angled part should set on top. Then there should be supports along the sides so there wont be as much flex. I have an instrument sitting behind me with about 270 pounds of string tension that I used the jig on. Success!

Good stuff Jon. Jigs are generally cheaper to build than workpieces cost to replace or repair ;-)

Mine is exactly the same, except I use 3x lengths of 20mm Perspex rod on which the workpiece sits and one rod at the "apex" of the jig for stability. The rods on the bottom have screws which I use to secure the jig to the bench. Very silly of me, as my bench is full of screwholes now :-\

routerscarfjig.jpg

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If you're using a plane with sandpaper on the bottom, why not just use the plane as a plane??????

The router jig is way quicker than any sandpaper.

Ummmm....that's a good idea too. Sandpaper, surforms, and files seem to be my solution for everything. Yes, plane it is. I'm sure the jig would be faster, but then I'd have to build a jig, and find someplace to keep it. Thanks for the help!

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