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Can You Take A Bolt On Neck And Set It Like A Dovetail Set Neck Tenon?


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:D hey guys i was just wondering because i have a custom WARMOTH Pro angled padddle neck.....22 frets and ebony fretboard....i was just wondering can you take a neck made to be a bolt on neck....can you still glue in the neck?? i am building a PRS Singlecut copy and i am atimate about making it a set neck....any input would be helpful
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Yes you can do that no problem. The Strat I built has a glued in neck using a neck that was originally was a screw on type. With a snug fit you have a large gluing surface with the underside as well as the sides of the neck and the pocket.

I like the look of the clean lines without a plate and screws and the rigidity it gives.

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If you're really 'atimate' do a search, this topic has been discussed (I've wondered the same thing in the past). You'll find tips on how to go about this.

Just for your information: certain Gibsons (early LP Jrs., Melody Makers) didn't use a tenon, they used the full width of the neck glued in. It's just as strong and easier to achieve.

I used to think setnecks were the only way to go. I now prefer bolt on necks-- or actually, I like using these inserts in place of the neck plate. I think that provides a nice middle ground between the two.

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None of the electric set neck guitars I have worked with have used a dove tail joint (not saying that there are none at all...) They all use a different type of joint called a tennon joint. The neck stick is cut a bit smaller in the portion goin into the body, with perpendicular sides (non-tapered) and cut a bit short so that is stop 1/4 to 1/2" shy of the end of the fret board. Then there are the methor that Mick is explaining. You can also do a search for Mykas neck joint jig. That might also give you some ideas.

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The obvious question is "why"? Acousticraft's point about taking off the aesthetically displeasing plate and bolts is about the only one I can think of. Gluing on a bolt-on neck won't be more "rigid" unless the holes for the bolts are compromised. Screwing two pieces of wood together is actually going to compress the fibres slightly, which is more "rigid" than glue will ever be.

But if it's for aesthetics or to facilitiate heel sculpting, that's a different thing.

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But if it's for aesthetics or to facilitiate heel sculpting, that's a different thing.

That's what I like about using inserts. You can still sculpt the heel as you like it, so you can keep pretty much the same look as a set neck. But you get the advantages of a bolt on. Which I think are significantly greater than anything a setneck might off to the guitar.

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Mick: like what, precisely? Swappable necks are a complete non-issue IMO, and inserts do not magically allow the same kind of smooth sculpting you can do with a neck-through or a set neck. No more than regular bolts with ferrules would allow.

Each style has its own distinct look and feel (and sound, although not in the 'my neck joint sustains more than your neck joint), and most bolt-on neck 'advantages' aren't all that relevant for electric guitars; neck resets shouldn't be necessary, and proper construction and material selection should keep the need for neck replacements due to warping very close to zero. At which point I'm out of major advantages. Acoustics, different kettle of fish.

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Mick: like what, precisely?

Blah blah, you're just being contrary...as usual.

Anyway, another thing I like about bolt ons is I find them easier to finish -- it's easier for me to finish the neck and body separately, and I find it especially easier to polish each piece separately.

I think an important part of the equation is what feels the best to you while you're playing (and not what feels best to PRS, or Fender or Gibson, etc.). I used to prefer the feel of a Gibson -- I liked how the neck angled back toward me a bit, and I liked how the wraparound bridge raises the strings up high off the body. But these days I prefer the straight Fender style, with the strings lower to the pickguard. (I like the scale length more too). Personally, the neck plate doesn't bother me, but then I'm a rhythm player, I rarely bother with solos, don't like all them squeaky notes up high there.

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Hey, it's a discussion forum, and we have different opinions. The ad hominem doesn't really address the question.

I'm not being contrary for the sake of it, but I really don't see any particularly significant advantages to building bolt-ons in terms of setup. Yes, they're easier to build (but only very, very slightly) but I'm not a factory so I don't think 'easy to make' is a reason to choose a certain style. And given we're building our own instruments, choice of scale length and neck angle is also entirely up to us.

Advantages would have to fall into the categories of playability, serviceability, sound, and aesthetics/design. For electrics, none of these things is 'better' in bolt-on neck guitars with the exception of servicability (= ease of neck replacement). Not 'worse' either. For acoustics I can think up several real advantages to bolt-on necks and no disadvantages (aesthetic or otherwise - they look the same). Hence my question of what advantages you were referring to.

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