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Major Dents, How Do I Keep Them From Getting Worse?


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Hey Everyone,

Recently bought a new project. It's Gretsch solid body, one of the import models. I found it on a local craigslist for 50.00.

The reason it was so cheap is because it has some pretty bad body damage on the rear of the guitar, the picture below being the worst. I'm not sure if I'm ready to fill/refinish this (maybe later on), so what can I do to keep the finish from constantly flaking off on my shirt ? I've heard of using super glue as a replacement clear coat, but I didn't know if that would work conisdering the size of the dents, and the fact that there is finish completely gone. There is also a small chip on the front side of the guitar. Could I fix that using nail polish and super glue ? I just want to disguise the damage as best as I can.

2658861184_b68c8df7c2.jpg

More pictures here.

Thanks!

-jftl

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Yikes. You could try filling with those shellac sticks that you melt with a lighter and drip into the holes. Might work for some of the smaller ones. To temporarily stop the finish from sloughing off on your shirt, I would use shellac again. Not the sticks, from the can. CA glue might work, but it can be hard to do stuff later on. Shellac sticks to anything and anything sticks to shellac. Fill up the holes and french polish if you're industriously minded, probably come out looking almost new. My suggestions are probably conservative. Someone else might know some awesome tricks with CA glue and boat resin....

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Yikes. You could try filling with those shellac sticks that you melt with a lighter and drip into the holes. Might work for some of the smaller ones. To temporarily stop the finish from sloughing off on your shirt, I would use shellac again. Not the sticks, from the can. CA glue might work, but it can be hard to do stuff later on. Shellac sticks to anything and anything sticks to shellac. Fill up the holes and french polish if you're industriously minded, probably come out looking almost new. My suggestions are probably conservative. Someone else might know some awesome tricks with CA glue and boat resin....

Hi Dugg,

Yeah, I'd like the fix to be semi-reversable just in case I do decide to refinish the guitar later. It plays good, and sounds good, it just doesn't look so good from the back. :D

-jftl

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erm ouch! :D

If you're not wanting to fill it properly yet I'd be tempted to suggest just tapeing over it so it doesn't snag. Maybe putting something over the bare wood so the tape doesn't rip it out when you take it off. :D hardly a pretty or proper solution but at least its the back and it'll at least stop the wood from getting even more damaged.

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erm ouch! B)

If you're not wanting to fill it properly yet I'd be tempted to suggest just tapeing over it so it doesn't snag. Maybe putting something over the bare wood so the tape doesn't rip it out when you take it off. :D hardly a pretty or proper solution but at least its the back and it'll at least stop the wood from getting even more damaged.

Yeah, I gotta admit it's not the best thing to be doing, but I'm just anxious to get some playing time with it. That's actually a pretty good suggestion, I could even use electrical tape so it matches the body color :D

-jftl

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I have semi disguised chips like that by mixing some black stain with laquer then using a toothpick to drip it it in place. If I did that I would gently scrape back the flaking finish then coat it a couple of times.

There is one small chip on the front, and one on the head stock that I plan on doing that with. I just want to be able to play this at my church without having to wear a black shirt every time I use it. :D

Thanks!

-jftl

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For temp repairs, I'd suggest sanding down the chipped edges of the finish so they don't have sharp edges. Some time spent with 220-grit paper and a beer or two, you'll be done in a short evening. Then, simply mask the area off and spraypaint it black.

When it's time to refinish, the spraypaint will just sand right off. But until then, it'll repel moisture and keep the damage slightly camoflaged.

This is the dead-simplest thing you could do for an actual repair. Aside from that, get some black duct tape and fergeddaboudit!

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