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How Would You Fix This Headstock Blunder?


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On my current build, I am using the neck from an existing bass (saves time and money) but wanted to put some ears on the headstock so that I wasnt stuck with a lame pointy design. The only problem is that apparently I am retarded and didn't take into account just how much wood I needed to add on to each side. The original headstock is maple but the wings are alder. The backstrap is alder and walnut and the top plate is flame maple and walnut. Here is a close up of my mistake.

DSCN0064.JPG

So my question is what would you guys do to fix this? The picture shows the side all sanded flat. Should I just stain the maple or what? I could leave it as is, but I would like to more closely match the color of the light spot. I know it is a nasty mistake, but what is done is done and now I just have to figure out how to fix it. Thanks.

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On my current build, I am using the neck from an existing bass (saves time and money) but wanted to put some ears on the headstock so that I wasnt stuck with a lame pointy design. The only problem is that apparently I am retarded and didn't take into account just how much wood I needed to add on to each side. The original headstock is maple but the wings are alder. The backstrap is alder and walnut and the top plate is flame maple and walnut. Here is a close up of my mistake.

>snip pic <

So my question is what would you guys do to fix this? The picture shows the side all sanded flat. Should I just stain the maple or what? I could leave it as is, but I would like to more closely match the color of the light spot. I know it is a nasty mistake, but what is done is done and now I just have to figure out how to fix it. Thanks.

If it bothers you then do an airbrush burst on the headstock, shoot the edges and sides of the headstock with black and fade to wood or some translucent color. Otherwise just leave it and move on.

MK

Edited by MiKro
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I'd wet it with mineral spirits or alcohol or something, (something that evaporates quickly and won't raise the grain to much) to get an idea of what it's going to look like under a finish - the color may darken in a fashion that makes the contrast better, or makes the contrast worse. or experiment throwing a little finish on a couple pieces of scrap of each wood and see how they compare.

I think if you carefully stain it lightly, with a little careful sanding, you could blend it in together, but it might be difficult.

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