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Scale Length, String Length, Intonation


jaycee
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I'm just starting to design my next project. Up until now I have bought plans but on this one I shall be drqwing the plans myself.

just checking a few things.

Scale lentgh = Nut to 12th fret, then double it.

String length = nut to bridge saddle, which will be longer than the scale length due to the compensation facor and the need for intonation.

I will be using a Tom bridge and tail stop.

Should I measure the Scale length at the 1st ( high E ) string and then angle the bridge away from the nut at that point ( say 3mm ) which would result in the lower E being 3mm longer than the scale length.

When setting the intonation would any of the saddles move closer to the bridge.

I have done a lot of research but would welcome any input

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measure the scale to the middle of the bridge. the D and G strings. the high e will be a little closer, and the low will be a little further. what do you mean about the intonation? "When setting the intonation would any of the saddles move closer to the bridge"

every guitar you set up the intonation on will have to be adjusted differently.

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measure the scale to the middle of the bridge. the D and G strings. the high e will be a little closer, and the low will be a little further.

no string should ever need to be shorter than the scale length!!! the intonation adjustmenst compensate for the fact the strings are pushed sharp as you fret them!!

having said that a bit of forward adjustment on the saddles is good insurance but if you put a post in front f the scale length you cut off most of your backwards adjustment.

measure the scale length, put the treble post about 1.5mm and the bass post 3mm back from that line. other people may use slightly different measurements and they will work too but these ones work well for me

stew macs fret calculator also supplies bridge measurements for most bridges.

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Thanks guys, that has clarified it.

The way I saw it was that, if the scale length for example is 650mm, then none of the saddles would need to go nearer to the nut ( in a perfect world ) otherwise that would make the scale length shorter.

So if I were to set the saddle point at the scale length i.e. 650mm + 1.5mm with some allowance for forward adjustment then all the other saddles when adjusted for the intonation would logically be behind that point.

So angling the bridge would allow for greater movement with the saddles that would otherwise have been taken up if it was not angled.

One of the things that concerned me was when I fixed the bridge would there be enought travel in the saddles to get the intonation correct. But I guess there will be because thats the way they are made.

Edited by jaycee
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well its measurements i remember... but only because i learnt them here and on other forums. Its not about ego stroking just about clarification of facts and best practice using sources better than my memory

i dont consider myself an egotisitical person and i hope thats not the way i come across, but who cares if it is if the info is good

:D

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measure the scale to the middle of the bridge. the D and G strings. the high e will be a little closer, and the low will be a little further. what do you mean about the intonation? "When setting the intonation would any of the saddles move closer to the bridge"

nope...the bottom stud is at the exact scale length...the top stud is 3/16" roughly back from that...

that is on a t.o.m.

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i dont consider myself an egotisitical person and i hope thats not the way i come across

You don't come across that way, at least not any more than anyone else here. :D

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Cheers guys. I know what you mean about confirmation Wez, I calculated the neck angle that I would need and later found a source that confirmed my result.

nope...the bottom stud is at the exact scale length...the top stud is 3/16" roughly back from that...

that is on a t.o.m.

Wes, the bottom stud is on the treble side and the top stud on the bass, so I guess your describing them as if your holding the guitar, yes ?

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