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Templates, Templates :)


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I make them myself by designing them in CAD, printing them 1:1 with reference marks and using spray adhesive to mount them onto MDF. I then bandsaw the MDF, rough sand the curves with the spindle sander, then finesse the template by hand. I then use that template to make a copy onto thicker MDF or Perspex.

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I make them myself by designing them in CAD, printing them 1:1 with reference marks and using spray adhesive to mount them onto MDF. I then bandsaw the MDF, rough sand the curves with the spindle sander, then finesse the template by hand. I then use that template to make a copy onto thicker MDF or Perspex.

How do you print off CAD , i dont have a big enough printer for a 1:1 copy of it any other ideas?

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I make them myself by designing them in CAD, printing them 1:1 with reference marks and using spray adhesive to mount them onto MDF. I then bandsaw the MDF, rough sand the curves with the spindle sander, then finesse the template by hand. I then use that template to make a copy onto thicker MDF or Perspex.

+1

Spend 40% of your time on the 'puter making it right and trying every possible tweak and curve change, to get the proportions right. Then 50% of your time making the first template PEEEEEEEERFECT. Then 10% making your final.

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You can print it on four separate sheets of paper and then tape them together. That's what I did. I don't have CAD, but my brother-in-law does, and he helped. There are other ways to get the job done though.

The poor man's method:

1. Draw your template in Paint.

2. Print it.

3. Measure what you printed.

4. Resize your drawing.

5. Print again.

6. Measure again.

7. Rinse and repeat.

That's what I did for everything except my body template. I don't recommend that method, but put it there to illustrate that you can work with just about anything.

-Dave

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You can print it on four separate sheets of paper and then tape them together. That's what I did. I don't have CAD, but my brother-in-law does, and he helped. There are other ways to get the job done though.

The poor man's method:

1. Draw your template in Paint.

2. Print it.

3. Measure what you printed.

4. Resize your drawing.

5. Print again.

6. Measure again.

7. Rinse and repeat.

That's what I did for everything except my body template. I don't recommend that method, but put it there to illustrate that you can work with just about anything.

-Dave

Cheers Dave, I might have a go at doing a simple template tonight because i am new to all of the guitar building process so i guess its gnna be a matter of trial and error.

How hard is it to get a simple template done on CAD?

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Just a note...when I see the word 'template' I think of an actual cutout of the body shape (using MDF, pine, whatever) that you then use to guide your router.

But you seem to be speaking of the plans for the guitar -- in which case, there are a variety of resources for that. Incuding this forum-- if you donate as a member, you'll have access to the downloads section.

You can bring the file to a printer if you like (or find a friend who works for an architect or similar) who'll print the plan for you in real size. An A3 size printer works pretty well, and an A4 printer will work too --in both cases, you'd print out various parts of the body, then tape the pages back together. If you don't feel like learning to use Autocad, surely you know someone who already knows how.

Now, even with the plan, you'll still need a template ---and like the man says, this is probably the most important step in making the guitar.

As long as you're starting out, one way to go would be to take an existing guitar body and use that to cut your template -- you'd use a follower bit for that. It helps if the body's a beater but I've had luck wrapping a guitar in celophane, then taping off the side to give a smooth edge for the router to follow.

This only works if you're looking to make an existing guitar design, of course.

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I print onto several sheets of A4 (or A3 at work). My templates have 10cm/1cm gridding which makes sure that I can align the sheets correctly, plus a reasonable overlap sheet to sheet. 4x A4 or 2x A3 is enough for most body shapes.

CAD is just a techy persons way of drawing out an instrument in "real scale" instead of setting out everything on a paper roll drawing by hand. Both are useful, and it's much cheaper to commit mistakes to wood which is 100g/m2 than wood which is several kg/m2. :-D

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Thank you everyone for your replies , :D I am going to have a go at trying to have a go at drawing some plans on autocad tonight. I am well excited this is my first time trying to build a guitar , Ive just gotta think of what sort of eletric i want to make, I went to see nickelback last night and some of there guitars where nice. Anyway ill have a look round i think ill need a relatively simple one. I also need to look into a printing shop or print of several pieces of paper B)

Cheers Guys

:D

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