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Truss Rod Channels


NotYou
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I've heard of luthiers cutting out truss rod channels a million different ways. I was wondering what methods you guy use.

Right now I'm using a laminate trimmer. It works okay, but it's tough to get it to move in a perfectly straight line, even with a guide.

This is an important and sometimes tricky part of making necks and I'm real curious about how different people do it. Keep in mind that we all don't have proper tools.

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I used a router with a edge guide. I learned on my test pieces to buy a differnt router next time. I have to take my hand off the handle to reach the off switch. Not good when trying to hold a running router steady.

Yep, having the switch right under your thumb while still holding both handles is the way it should be. In fact, most tools these days seem to have a button that you have to hold down with constant pressure. Just release it, and the router stops. To make it stay there, you need to press a lock-in button.

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Haha...I guess I am the only one using a router with an edge guide...I get a straight line every time though...

Nope. Thats the way I do it also

Me too, although I have also used a table with a fence. However, having the cutting action all happening underneath where I can't see it makes me nervous. I like to be able to see that the little router bit is chewing up the centre line exactly ALL the time :D

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I like a laminate trimmer because of the lower power. Depending on the kind of wood, it sometimes makes things easier. I try to not make too much noise in my shop too, so a router is always a last resort.

I can't afford a router table at the moment, so I've found I can get a straight line by clamping boards behind the guide and in front of the trimmer, so it can't move in either direction. It's not pretty, but it works perfectly.

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I have a router table and I still prefer to do it with a handheld router.

I do it on a B&D Workmate with an edge guide.

Less set-up time and it doesn't matter if the edges of my neck blank aren't perfectly straight.

Like this:

trusschannel01.jpg

Clickies:

http://h1.ripway.com/jcharrist/guitars/trusschannel02.jpg

http://h1.ripway.com/jcharrist/guitars/trusschannel03.jpg

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I have a router table and I still prefer to do it with a handheld router.

I do it on a B&D Workmate with an edge guide.

Less set-up time and it doesn't matter if the edges of my neck blank aren't perfectly straight.

Like this:

http://h1.ripway.com/jcharrist/guitars/trusschannel01.jpg

Clickies:

http://h1.ripway.com/jcharrist/guitars/trusschannel02.jpg

http://h1.ripway.com/jcharrist/guitars/trusschannel03.jpg

That's so obvious, Im ashamed for not thinking of it. I've been doing it in a similar fashion, but using a workbench. The Workmate idea looks like it'll work much easier.

This is why I started this thread.

Edited by NotYou
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I can't afford a router table at the moment, so I've found I can get a straight line by clamping boards behind the guide and in front of the trimmer, so it can't move in either direction. It's not pretty, but it works perfectly.

3/4" melamine/ply/mdf with a hole cut into the center is all you need for a router table. A straight chunk of wood and two clamps are all you need for a fence. :D

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3/4" melamine/ply/mdf with a hole cut into the center is all you need for a router table. A straight chunk of wood and two clamps are all you need for a fence. :D

Basically what I was saying. I would use thinner wood though, because the thickness of the wood is reducing the reach of the router bit. In some cases, especially with small bits, it makes a difference.

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3/4" melamine/ply/mdf with a hole cut into the center is all you need for a router table. A straight chunk of wood and two clamps are all you need for a fence. :D

Basically what I was saying. I would use thinner wood though, because the thickness of the wood is reducing the reach of the router bit. In some cases, especially with small bits, it makes a difference.

Ah, must've missed page 2 B)

What bluesy said :D

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