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Wire Gauge?


L0Rd
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You can use about anything you want, but i think around 22 AWG is pretty common. Others will surely correct me if I am wrong.

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For most applications, the lengths will be short enough so that there is minimal resistance. Something like 22 gauge will have a resistance of like 50 ohms (or less) per 1000 feet. You can find tables online that give exact specs. But for a foot of cable, the performance difference between .05 and .1 ohms is not going to be huge, from what I understand.

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there are basically two types of wire:

Solid and Stranded

Solid is where one solid piece of wire is used with in the insulation, stranded is of course multiple pieces of thinner gauge wire used to make a larger gauge. For example, a piece of 22 gauge speaker wire that is stranded may have 20+ "strands" of wire to make it 22 G.

To further confuse things, there is some with the opinion that twisted-stranded wire has less resistance and hence, why it is preferred for high-speed networks that still rely on copper.

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Stranded or solid will work equally well. Solid is actually easier to use because it stays how you bend it. Also if you use solid wire, you don't have to worry about stray strands shorting to other parts of the circuit. (Of course if you're careful that won't happen, but with solid wire it CAN'T happen. :D )

There is so little going on in a guitar electrically that any kind of conductive material should work. You have a signal in millivolts, and I can't imagine how small the current must be.

And there are SO many variables in the signal chain, from strings to speakers and room size, I wouldn't get hung up on the kind of wire in the control cavity. :D Use what you have on hand.

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Stranded or solid will work equally well. Solid is actually easier to use because it stays how you bend it. Also if you use solid wire, you don't have to worry about stray strands shorting to other parts of the circuit. (Of course if you're careful that won't happen, but with solid wire it CAN'T happen. :D )

There is so little going on in a guitar electrically that any kind of conductive material should work. You have a signal in millivolts, and I can't imagine how small the current must be.

And there are SO many variables in the signal chain, from strings to speakers and room size, I wouldn't get hung up on the kind of wire in the control cavity. :D Use what you have on hand.

The downside of solid, is when it has to be moved. Particularly if it is connecting a part that has to be lifted off for servicing. Solid wire will break after surprisingly few bends because the metal stress fatigues, especially on sharp bends.

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Stranded or solid will work equally well. Solid is actually easier to use because it stays how you bend it. Also if you use solid wire, you don't have to worry about stray strands shorting to other parts of the circuit. (Of course if you're careful that won't happen, but with solid wire it CAN'T happen. :D )

There is so little going on in a guitar electrically that any kind of conductive material should work. You have a signal in millivolts, and I can't imagine how small the current must be.

And there are SO many variables in the signal chain, from strings to speakers and room size, I wouldn't get hung up on the kind of wire in the control cavity. B) Use what you have on hand.

The downside of solid, is when it has to be moved. Particularly if it is connecting a part that has to be lifted off for servicing. Solid wire will break after surprisingly few bends because the metal stress fatigues, especially on sharp bends.

Thanks couldn't have said it better

btw if you are worried about those stray wires just twist the strands to gather then solder them together that way they go in to the eyelets on the pots clean and easy :D

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Paul, what are the benefits of that fancy wire? I am just curious.

I use it mostly for stompboxes. It's a tough wire and the insulation is much stiffer than regular stranded wire. So it acts kind of like solid core wire, but it's stranded wire, which is more durable than solid core is. It stays where you put it once you learn a few tricks about it.

Basically, if you want some wire that's going to be very reliable, that's the stuff to use. If I were a guitar builder, I would use that stuff in my guitars.

Anyhow, at the end of the day, cheaper wire works just as well - especially in a guitar that has wires no longer than a few inches. :D

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Oh, and there's anoher thing buzzing me right now... Does the 250k and 250k push/pull potentiometers require quality...I mean, do I have to get the genuine Fender stuff or the all parts or anything else will do the job? same for the 5 way switch...?

Thanks again

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As long as you get them from a reputable source (stew-mac, mouser, whatever) then you will be fine. Genuine Fender usually means "huge markup".

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  • 3 weeks later...
Ive just rewired my guitar with wire i took outa an old computer

I've done that before, too. But I find that the kind of wire that they use in computers doesn't take solder all that well... :D

Edited by Paul Marossy
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