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Creating A Neck Idea.....


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When doing the first steps for creating a neck, i run the FB surface and Headplate surface on a jointer and then use a robosander/drill press combo to do the back of the head and the body glue surface.

I was thinking, if i could find the right router bit, i could do something like this on my router table. (see pics)

not sure where to get such a cutter though.

what do u guys think???? anyone doing this now?

router_table.jpg

thanks!

matt

madhattr88@gmail.com

Edited by madhattr88
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This is very common for body shaping, and I see no reason why it wouldn't work for rough shaping a neck. For the router bit, you can check MLCS and Freud to see if they have ones long enough with the bearing guide.

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I'm not entirely sure what you are trying to do here. In the picture it looks like you are running the FB side against he router bit. But you already said that you ran it across the jointer which will have flatten and thicknessed that side already. So I don't see the need for using the router table. The other problem I see is keeping the neck vertical. You are balancing on roughly a 3/4" wide template surface. That is not going to be the easiest to keep perfectly flat. Even a slight bit of angling and you'll end up with a dip or a gouge in the FB surface.

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I'm not entirely sure what you are trying to do here. In the picture it looks like you are running the FB side against he router bit. But you already said that you ran it across the jointer which will have flatten and thicknessed that side already. So I don't see the need for using the router table. The other problem I see is keeping the neck vertical. You are balancing on roughly a 3/4" wide template surface. That is not going to be the easiest to keep perfectly flat. Even a slight bit of angling and you'll end up with a dip or a gouge in the FB surface.

well i was hoping to do the back side of the neck also. that way i can do everything in one operation.

right now, its the jointer for the FB surface and Headplate surface, but ten its a lot of other things for the back side.

Edited by madhattr88
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Since you need to shape the back of the neck anyway, you're creating an unneccesary extra step.

hmmmm. maybe this picture will help. if i do the FB and Headplate surface on the jointer (like i am currently doing), i can then do this. (see pic)

i'm only concerned with the GREEN surfaces. my necks have a 2° neck angle and a 15° headstock angle.

the barrel shape will be done with a rasp.

router_table_2.jpg

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you are complicating this way more than you need to.

easy way to do what your asking:

before you scarf, plane the headstock scarf part to the right thickness. that fixes what you want to do,

and to profile the depth, just use a bandsaw!! and smooth your angle with a belt sander!

It's not a scarf joint. It's a solid piece

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You could do this, but it will be very difficult. The jointer is a great tool for a true reference surface, and a lot faster and more reliable than a shaper. As for the back of the neck, a dedicated jig table and hand router with roundover bit for ruff shaping(you could have a special bit made if you want to get closer, but that is going to be a large bit and those can be tricky(prone to tear out) and expensive). A series of dedicated shapers(top quality) with special cutters could make the job faster, but seems like you would need to do a fair bit of volume to make that a reasonable investment.

A jointer for your front reference surface and front of headstock is pretty clean and efficient. A bandsaw to ruff the back of the neck, the ruff taper and headstock is efficient and reliable. I use an open ended thickness sander to thickness the back of the headstock. I use a spindle sander to shape my volutes(used to use the end of my bench belt sander). I use a jig that I designed to for a hand held router to shape the headstock, route for the truss, the neck taper is finalized, and bring the thickness of the shaft within about 1/16th. I use hand tools(spokeshave, scraper, rasp, sanding block and paper to finalize the shape of the back. Several tools, but pretty simple.

I do have a roundover bit that I can use to ruff shape the back of the necks profile, but it takes too long to set up. It is also removes so much material that I had to take several passes to avoid tear out. A smaller 3/4" roundover could work also(and would be simpler), but you are only avoiding a couple minutes worth of spokeshave work since you would still have to finish shape it after the router ruffs the shape.

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TEAR OUT!

<extreme drama>

The router table is an evil piece of project wrecking machinery. Use with caution. Nothing is more disheartening than taking a bite that you can't fix out of your 5A Flame maple neck.

Holy crap I have been bitten by it several times lately and the more figured the wood the worse the mess is. Keep your bits sharp and your hand steady!

I have even had issues with the router lately on joining highly flamed 1/4" tops. I am doing most work by hand now to save my wood...

</extreme drama>

Ok all drama aside you will need to be careful with this shaping idea. I would definitely use the jointer for the Fretboard surface.

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+1

Fixed routers (tables and overhead) can be an easy way to blast chunks of your workpiece across the room, most likely into that matching pile of rough wood chips and shavings that you didn't want to dig through to find the piece and glue it back in.

I cut very very little depth of stock at a time, usually 5mm or less. That's 1/5". Slowly, carefully and reliably :-D

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TEAR OUT!

<extreme drama>

The router table is an evil piece of project wrecking machinery. Use with caution. Nothing is more disheartening than taking a bite that you can't fix out of your 5A Flame maple neck.

Holy crap I have been bitten by it several times lately and the more figured the wood the worse the mess is. Keep your bits sharp and your hand steady!

I have even had issues with the router lately on joining highly flamed 1/4" tops. I am doing most work by hand now to save my wood...

</extreme drama>

Ok all drama aside you will need to be careful with this shaping idea. I would definitely use the jointer for the Fretboard surface.

good point. what if i use the jointer for the FB and HEADPLATE srface....and then.... use a router planing jig for the back of headstock and the 2° angle??

i saw the idea here:

http://projectguitar.ibforums.com/index.ph...st&p=379441

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I can see some major flaws in the original idea...if you run it through your mind actually doing it...or actually try something like it with scrap and any template...you will see that the fence can't be used to provide a right angle and support and that the whole thing relies on being held upright while it follows the template...at the ver least you are likely to get shudder. Conventional means are so much more reliable (planing the headstock to the correct depth before scarfing) and as said, much of the exercise is redundant.

The last post is better...but again redundant and I can't quite understand what the motivation is...a lot of bulk material can be removed with a band saw...the rest needs so much shaping anyway, it doesn't seem to make a lot of sense to build a machine to do such a relatively minor part of the shaping...

just some opinions...good ideas...wrong applications...

pete

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I can see some major flaws in the original idea...if you run it through your mind actually doing it...or actually try something like it with scrap and any template...you will see that the fence can't be used to provide a right angle and support and that the whole thing relies on being held upright while it follows the template...at the ver least you are likely to get shudder. Conventional means are so much more reliable (planing the headstock to the correct depth before scarfing) and as said, much of the exercise is redundant.

The last post is better...but again redundant and I can't quite understand what the motivation is...a lot of bulk material can be removed with a band saw...the rest needs so much shaping anyway, it doesn't seem to make a lot of sense to build a machine to do such a relatively minor part of the shaping...

just some opinions...good ideas...wrong applications...

pete

i understand and i really do value everyones opinion, that's why i'm posing this question.

i'm looking for a better way to take care of these surfaces. especially the 2° surface,it has to be damn near perfect or it will throw off my neck angle, centering, etc.

how would you guys accomplish this??? i think i need more detail than just a bandsaw and sander.

thanks! i really really apreciate everyone's help!!! this forum is the best around!!!!

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