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Inlay On Headstock


Kenneth
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So I have this question on my current (and future) build.

I have made my initials in MOP on the headstock

To the question....

What's the best/easiest way to mask (is that the proper word for it...!?) the MOP before painting.

When I was a kid and building models there was this "paint" that created a thin coat that you could peel of....

Could something like that be used!?

How do you do it otherwise!?

Edit...

MOP not glued yet...

Head2.jpg

or this closeup:

http://i270.photobucket.com/albums/jj116/S...aster/Head3.jpg

/Kenneth

Edited by Kenneth
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Ive read in the stew mac finish book(I think) to carefully scrape the color coats off the inlay, then clear coat. Not sure how well that will work for you. I'm gonna give it a go on the build I'm getting ready to start finishing. It also has some fairly narrow inlays. Here it is.

PICS010.jpg

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So I have this question on my current (and future) build.

I have made my initials in MOP on the headstock

To the question....

What's the best/easiest way to mask (is that the proper word for it...!?) the MOP before painting.

When I was a kid and building models there was this "paint" that created a thin coat that you could peel of....

Could something like that be used!?

How do you do it otherwise!?

Edit...

MOP not glued yet...

Head2.jpg

or this closeup:

http://i270.photobucket.com/albums/jj116/S...aster/Head3.jpg

/Kenneth

Frisk masking film is specifically designed for this kind of work. It's a low tack transparent film commonly used by airbrush artists, though it comes in a roll, so if you only want a very small amount it wouldn't be very economical to buy a whole roll.

I use it all the time so if it's any use to you, email me your postal address and I'll send you a piece in the post and see how you get on with it.

Jim :D

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People who work on pottery and ceramics use a product called wax resist witch can be painted in very fine lines. The idea is that glazes (like paints) don't stick to it. You can paint very fine lines and intracite designs. You can clean it up with a damp rag if you make a mistake. I don't know if it would work on a laquer finish though. I will experiment the next time I spray.

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What Jim said. The stuff I use is call FriskIt and is available at any good art supply shop. It's about $35 bucks a roll, but that is like a life time supply unless you do large guitar body inlays like I do.

If you are using a rub on stain and you have glued in your inlay with epoxy (not superglue), then you don't have to mask at all. Just stain and wipe it off the shell. If you superglued it, it has be my experience that small gaps can be left and the stain can get in under the glue and discolor the inlay. Also, if you are using a light colored ablam materials like agora the stain can get in under the shave lines and cause minor discoloration. In this case, when you are rubbing on the stain, just be careful not to get to much on the shell and wipe for the stain on the shell right away. If you are using a spray on stain, FriskIt is the way to go. This stuff is sort of like the stuff that is on the cell phone faces when you first buy them.

Good luck with the project

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People who work on pottery and ceramics use a product called wax resist witch can be painted in very fine lines. The idea is that glazes (like paints) don't stick to it. You can paint very fine lines and intracite designs. You can clean it up with a damp rag if you make a mistake. I don't know if it would work on a laquer finish though. I will experiment the next time I spray.

Always be kinda wary of adding any kind of wax to a surface you're planning to clearcoat or lacquer afterwards, as it will also potentially act as a resist to the final finish you apply. Particularly around an inlay like this, as the resist will unneringly find a place to hide in the smallest gap in the surface (around the inlay) and regardless of how carefully you clean up afterwards, potentially cause you all kinds of problems when you come to shoot your finish coat. :D

Jim :D

Edited by Foggy
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FriskIt also comes in sheet packs, so if you want to mail order a small supply, that might be the way to go. I'd completely forgotten about the stuff, but last night I was doing some post holiday clean up and found a roll tucked in a box with some airbrush paints. Even so, I probably wouldn't have thought to use it instead of masking tape if I hadn't read this. Thanks!

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