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My First Student And His Bass


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I like building however it may be a strech to say I want to make living from it. So receintly I took in a student. This build took all of about 20 hrs in my shop. He was not a skilled craftsman but we managed to pull it off. It was my first fender Bass clone (or close to it as a clone can get) so it was a bit of uncharted territory at least for the neck and skunk stripe. We used a Ron Kirn template for the body and pickguard.

The Bass is a 51 P Bass design with a 22 fret fingerboard. maple neck and fingerboard and Alder body. The bass is not finished as that is my students responsibility. Possibly I may get a finished picture As we still have to cut the nut slots

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The happy camper

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Very nice looking rig. I can imagine it was a bit different trying the one piece neck/fretboard with skunk stripe. Seems like a much more difficult method, although some people might love not having to glue up a fingerboard I suppose. Anyhow, looks like it came out very nice, hopefully he'll send you some pics once he's painted her all up. J

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Very nice looking rig. I can imagine it was a bit different trying the one piece neck/fretboard with skunk stripe. Seems like a much more difficult method, although some people might love not having to glue up a fingerboard I suppose. Anyhow, looks like it came out very nice, hopefully he'll send you some pics once he's painted her all up. J

It is certainly easier to do a fingerboard for two reasons. One my slotting jig needed a 1" adjustment above my current fingerboard pin location (slotting template pin) and the neck was slotted at the headstock width. You can just make out the slots on a large board in one of the pictures. This put more wear and tear on my fret blade(table saw). Also I had to use a mill rather than a router table to cut the skunk stripe slot, I didnt really believe I could get a perfect slot using a router, inevitably something can happen routing a truss rod slot (slight ding to the side). With a fingerboard these small imperfections are covered up. With the mill the slot was easy to make, just took a bit longer.

Also the Warmouth bass truss rod has a very large head, so the skunk stripe had to be 3/8" wide so the head would fit. I believe most fenders are have 1/4" stripe, so this was one change in the plan. It was an interesting build as I was able to add to my knowledge. I cant say I want to keep making skunk stripe necks unless I am asked to do so.

Just wondering if I should take in more students?

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