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How to use a Dremel


renablistic
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uhhhhhh. i'm an inlaying noob. ANY and ALL info and pointers (and direction on which bits to use) on how to use the dremel will be appreciated.

Here are some specific questions:

1) WHICH BITS DO I USE?!?!

2) what speed is best for routing the inlay "hole"? (RPM)

3) Would the flex shaft be easier to use?

4) Where do i buy diazepam to stop this damn shaking?!?!

5) What else should i know? (pointers and such)

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well, ill help ya with the diazepam :D pretend your schizophreniac to a doctor on checkup, i think that might work! only jokin! im also wonderin about the dremel routing stuff, cos i wanna inlay sometime.

mike

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Dremel for routing inlays help 101

Use the lower speeds, they give you more torque, something you want when inlaying into ebony, too fast and you'll smoke out the wood, scorch it. That's BAD when inlaying into maple.

I use the Stew-Mac fordom router. Even at it's fastest speed it's still relatively slow. Around 1 or 2 on the dremel. Dremel has a lot of speed you don't need for routing.

Check out these links and products..

http://www.stewmac.com/shop/Inlay,_pearl/T...rl_cutting.html

http://www.stewmac.com/shop/Tools/Foredom_...tary_Tools.html

As far as bits go Dremel has tons of bits that all look very cool and seem magically usable somehow. For inlaying I use only one type of bit- the stew mac carbide down cut bits, in the different sizes.

The carbide makes them last, and they cut exeptionally clean, with little or no fraying of the edge route.

Also, using the flex shaft will stop your hands from that "vibrating for hours after your done inlaying" that you feel. :D

I know these are pricey things, but you are only as good as your tools.

Craig

Oh- and before someone jumps on me- No, I don't represent Stew-Mac. They just happen to have alot of the best tools in one place. Others may be cheaper, but I personally haven't researched it. They also have many tools and bits made just for them. Also try Luthiers Mercantile, (LMI) and others.

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I'm new to this also and was wondering about the bits in paticular. I've got the regular router bit for the big stuff, and a few different ball end bits for the undercut, but what shape is recommended for following your line. Is it the little cone shaped one or the small square ended one.

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I don't "undercut" my work. I can't speak for others.

I never understood this concept.. and most people's routes are not tight enough to require "undercutting" CNC does not make an undercut and that's as tight as it gets.. cutting a straight edge only requires a straight bit. The carbide downcut bits, or any straight router bit will provide this.

I use one type of bit for all my routes. I engrave with a hand graver tool, not a dremel.

Craig

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As far as bits go, I made a great score the last time I visited the dentist. At the unbelievable rates they charge these days I try to make sure I get something out of it aside from a $700 crown or whatever. Ask the dentist for any used bits they have put out of commission. The last dentist I visited gave me a whole bag (at least 200 bits!) of 1/8" and 1/16" shaft bits, all sorts of sizes and types. You can buy different size collets to fit these bits in your dremel. They are great for hand shaping etc. and are the best quality.

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ok. I'll be visiting the dentist in about 4 months. After christmas I'm ording a bunch of pearloid inlays, bits, and a pearl saw. Right now I'm using the engraving bit i got with the dremel, and although it's a bit big (and the end is ball-ended), and I've inlayed a few stars (which are hard with the big bit) I've been using the highest setting on my dremel. And i still haven't found out how to connnect the flex shaft to the dremel... :D

Yep, I'm a natural at inlaying. just gotta keep on practicing. LGM, better watch out theres (about to be) a new "super-inlayer" in town. **blows smoking dremel**

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You guys must all have cool dentists. Mine said they don't keep the old ones around and aren't allowed to give up that stuff anyway because of some insurance stuff. Same reason they wouldn't let me keep my wisdom teeth that were taken out. I thought I should get to keep them since they were from my wisdom. If any of you made a good score at the dentist and would like to part with some for a fair price I would be intersted. Pretty Pretty please?

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One thing I allways wondered; inlay seems to be pretty thin for the most part, how does one avoid "dremel-ing" too deep? Is that just a practice thing? Does anyone do inlay with exacto knives and very tiny chisels?

it's pretty hard to go too deep, and now that i've been using it awile and been practicing like crazy, i find myself thinking i went too deep, but it isn't deep enough.

and yes, i did try inlaying with an exacto knife (and a 5 in 1 and a small chisel), and it was hard as hell. i give props (what a dumb word, right?) to anyone who does inlaying via chisels and exactos on a regualer basis.

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