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Tone Of Toona Febrifuga? (vietnamese Mahogany)


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Does anyone have any experience with Toona Febrifuga (Vietnamese mahogany)? I'm wondering how it sounds for solid bodies compared to Honduran or African mahogany. I'm thinking of buying one of those Explorer bodies on ebay. The seller is in the UK, but says the bodies are made in Korea using "Vietnamese Mahogany". The pictures look good, and his Explorer bodies weigh in between 4.5-6 lbs. Any info would be appreciated.

Edited by Stolysmaster
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It's a Toona, here found this link:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toona

I dont think that anybody can really reply to your question, the final sound of a guitar comes from multiple factors, the woods are only part of the equation. :D

The stiffness to weight ratio can also vary tremendously from a board to another so the "weight" and "produced acoustic sound" can be totally different, even from a piece providing from the same blank.

I would say that right now, your most important concern would be to actually ask to that dealer if he can provide you with any proof of the wood's internal moisture content, because you want to make sure that the wood is properly seasoned unless you are prepared for that. Preferably 10-12% but before using it you must leave it stacked until it drops down to 8-9%

And if you get a good deal on blanks which are properly seasoned (preferably quatersawn), then that's all full of win :D

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I dont think that anybody can really reply to your question, the final sound of a guitar comes from multiple factors, the woods are only part of the equation. :D

My question assumes "all other things being equal"; of course. Obviously there are many factors contributing to the final sound. But it can be said, for instance, that hard maple and ebony will usually sound brighter and tighter than Honduran/African mahogany and Indian rosewood; all other things being equal. Woods DO sound differently and we CAN make some generalizations about their tone; it is given that there can be exceptions to these generalizations.

I'm just wondering if anyone can make a general statement comparing the tone of Vietnamese mahogany to Honduran/African mahogany; all other things being equal.

Your point on moisture content is very well taken and something I had forgotten to consider! I live in Colorado, which is drier than most places, and wood can sometimes warp from drying out too fast here if it comes in with a high moisture content. I have actually had this happen. Maybe it would be best if I select some local blanks and buy an Explorer template, then cut it out myself, knowing that the wood has been here in Colorado a while.

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My question assumes "all other things being equal"; of course. Obviously there are many factors contributing to the final sound. But it can be said, for instance, that hard maple and ebony will usually sound brighter and tighter than Honduran/African mahogany and Indian rosewood; all other things being equal.

All things can NOT be equal because like I've mentioned, every guitar is unique and every piece of wood is unique :D

I'm happy that you can say that "hard maple and ebony will usually sound brighter and tighter than Honduran/African mahogany and Indian rosewood; all other things being equal."

To me this makes total non sens and is just bruhaha

The Mahogany family, especially the sapelli specie is probably THE most bright and tight sounding wood you can get depending which boards you select, and I think that I would certainly not be using it if it sounded "warm and muddy" like most people who have no experience using it tend to believe because of those general guidelines that you mention, in fact I was one of the very first to build full "mahogany" 8 string guitars :D

But of course this is my opinion which is of course subjective and based on my personal experience as a builder.

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My question assumes "all other things being equal"; of course. Obviously there are many factors contributing to the final sound. But it can be said, for instance, that hard maple and ebony will usually sound brighter and tighter than Honduran/African mahogany and Indian rosewood; all other things being equal.

All things can NOT be equal because like I've mentioned, every guitar is unique and every piece of wood is unique :D

I'm happy that you can say that "hard maple and ebony will usually sound brighter and tighter than Honduran/African mahogany and Indian rosewood; all other things being equal."

To me this makes total non sens and is just bruhaha

The Mahogany family, especially the sapelli specie is probably THE most bright and tight sounding wood you can get depending which boards you select, and I think that I would certainly not be using it if it sounded "warm and muddy" like most people who have no experience using it tend to believe because of those general guidelines that you mention, in fact I was one of the very first to build full "mahogany" 8 string guitars :D

But of course this is my opinion which is of course subjective and based on my personal experience as a builder.

I specifically wrote "Honduran/African mahogany", not refering to the sapelli species at all. But, if I understand you correctly, no generalizations regarding the comparative tones of different woods can be made at all..."just bruhaha"....except, of course, Sapelli, which is "THE most bright and tight sounding wood you can get depending..."...Right. All I can say is that my experience is different than yours.

Edited by Stolysmaster
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:D:DB)

I would definitely go with local timbers. Good for the local economy, and already acclimated to your area.

Best advice yet. Thanks, I think I will. That way I should be able to find some mahogany from somewhere in the Americas. Don't think I can go wrong with that if it's been here a while and dry. I'll just have to spend for the template before I purchase the wood.

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I specifically wrote "Honduran/African mahogany", not refering to the sapelli species at all. But, if I understand you correctly, no generalizations regarding the comparative tones of different woods can be made at all..."just bruhaha"....except, of course, Sapelli, which is "THE most bright and tight sounding wood you can get depending..."...Right. All I can say is that my experience is different than yours.

Obvioussly you are not reading my post...

sapelli specie is probably THE most bright and tight sounding wood you can get depending which boards you select

I find funny that little trolls like Our Souls inc. enjoy making fun of this, however what is paradoxal is that this same troll will tell you that the sound will change depending on the density of the wood which is exactly what I am trying to explain to you...

I'm sorry to bother you so much and that you find more logical to believe in stereotypes like "mahogany sounds warm and muddy" and "maple sounds bright and snappy", indeed that all makes perfect sens, but in some ways, I am delighted and very happy that you enjoy that romance and poetry.

And since to your eyes, "mahogany" sounds warm and that you have so much experience about the subject, then why create a topic?

I'm also loving the way you compare an african specie to a specie from Honduras.

B):D:P

Laugh as much as you want mister "I know everything"....

Its really a hilarious experience to watch guys like you who pretend to know everything and dont even know the difference between what they call "mahogany" and "sapelli"... :D

and already acclimated to your area.

Funny that now that I've mentioned acclimatisation, you now start to think and mention it, because without me, you would be talking about "mahogany sounds warm and muddy type of conversations", which are indeed very constructive B)

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"Little troll" .

You're adoreable, if not somewhat pathetic.

:D

He's not adoreable at all, but extremely pathetic. This guy calls YOU a "know-it-all"!?? What a joke. And it seems that he is the one who has trouble reading previous posts: I did qoute him stating the word "depending", but he did not bother to read that. I NEVER used the word "warm" to describe the tone of mahogany, as he states. I have simply related my experiences, as I stated earlier. My experience tells me that Honduran and African Mahogany generally DO sound similar to each other. I started the topic because I am not familiar with "Vietnamese" mahogany. That should be obvious to a critical reader of my posts. I was playing guitar, and determining what contributes to tone and how, LONG before this genius with a chip on his shoulder was even born. It will be interesting to see what brilliant tidbit he comes up with next in order to try and convince us he even has a clue! But I do have a bit of advice for him..."Increase the fiber, decrease the caffeine".

Edited by Stolysmaster
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Honduran and African sound (wait) *similar* but in noooooo way are they the same. African refers to several species, which all sound different again. Hufschmid is correct in that different planks sound different. Don't write off other peoples experience, especially when they take the time to help by contributing, otherwise you might as well not ask at all.

I happen to agree that a degree of troll-like baiting is going on. Get with the programme before you wake up next to a horse's head.

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Honduran and African sound (wait) *similar* but in noooooo way are they the same. African refers to several species, which all sound different again. Hufschmid is correct in that different planks sound different. Don't write off other peoples experience, especially when they take the time to help by contributing, otherwise you might as well not ask at all.

I happen to agree that a degree of troll-like baiting is going on. Get with the programme before you wake up next to a horse's head.

I love how you elitists come in and call people names, make weak,chump-like threats, and expect no response.

I happen to find the "only I know the true tone of wood" argument posted by one particular member here HILARIOUS!! Hence the laughy heads ^^ up there.

I reserve the right to laugh at anyone I want to, including anyone who tries to call me a troll.

I come here to ask questions when I don't know something, post findings when I find something, and see other builds that people are doing.

I've contributed $$ each year that I've been coming here.

In my thousand + posts, I've only had sharp words as a response to stupidity. Stupidity exactly like you display in your little post here.

you're going on the ignore list with your Bae up there.

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Honduran and African sound (wait) *similar* but in noooooo way are they the same. African refers to several species, which all sound different again. Hufschmid is correct in that different planks sound different. Don't write off other peoples experience, especially when they take the time to help by contributing, otherwise you might as well not ask at all.

I happen to agree that a degree of troll-like baiting is going on. Get with the programme before you wake up next to a horse's head.

I see that you and I at least partially agree that Honduran and "African" Mahogany sound similar; as I said, that is MY experience based on the "African" species I happen to have heard, and on numerous occasions. Thanks for educating me to the fact that there are several African species referred to as Mahogany. It makes me wonder which ones I was listening too.

It goes without saying that there can be "different planks" of the same species that sound differently. Of course. BUT, as I have stated before, generalizations about species CAN be made when comparing tones; acknowledging that there will always be some exceptions. I will point to your own comments to back up my assertions regarding these generalizations.

Hufschmid discounted his own "experience" with his own statements and by misquoting me; an indication that he does not pay attention and is more interested in trying to impress others by displaying a pompous attitude. I have much more of a problem with that than I do with the fact that his experience may differ from mine. I see no problem asking a question and not expecting to be answered with a condescending and asinine response.

I was, and still am, wanting to here from someone's experience how Toona Febrifuga usually compares in tone to Honduran Mahogany. Maybe I'm barking up the wrong tree.

Edited by Stolysmaster
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I was, and still am, wanting to here from someone's experience how Toona Febrifuga usually compares in tone to Honduran Mahogany. Maybe I'm barking up the wrong tree.

I've never seen it used as a tonewood. I have seen it used in garbage east asian furniture. Based on that, I would not buy it unless I had the plank in my hand to inspect prior to purchase.

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I was, and still am, wanting to here from someone's experience how Toona Febrifuga usually compares in tone to Honduran Mahogany. Maybe I'm barking up the wrong tree.

I've never seen it used as a tonewood. I have seen it used in garbage east asian furniture. Based on that, I would not buy it unless I had the plank in my hand to inspect prior to purchase.

Thank you very much, masterblastor! Good info to know.

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It would be useful to clarify that "Honduran" Mahogany is in fact Swietenia macrophylla and directly classifying species removes the confusion issues commonly found with informal names.

If I recall, Swietenia macrophylla is also plantation grown now so quality can also vary hugely and by extension the "tone". Without direct comparison (I think it will be difficult to find this) I would stick with the rules of using "good wood". Straight even tight grain, etc. It doesn't describe the properties of the wood, but it will at least be a good first step in exploring a new material.

I know nothing of Toona febrifuga, and it is more than likely not even a "Mahogany" except in informal name. If the grain is interlocked and possesses an open pore structure then it may work in a similar manner to "common" Mahoganies although tonally it still could be a totally different ballpark. Perhaps it is related to Toona ciliata, Australian red Cedar? It might help your research if you explore the Toona genus.

I hope it's not that horrendously bland crap that many Asian factories use when churning out "Mahogany" guitars!

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I hope it's not that horrendously bland crap that many Asian factories use when churning out "Mahogany" guitars!

LOL, Or "Mahogany" bed frames and headboards. My daughter should outgrow it in a year. I'll chop it up, make a guitar out of it and post some sound samples when that happens. :D That is, If I can take a router to it without the wood blowing up.

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I hope it's not that horrendously bland crap that many Asian factories use when churning out "Mahogany" guitars!

LOL, Or "Mahogany" bed frames and headboards. My daughter should outgrow it in a year. I'll chop it up, make a guitar out of it and post some sound samples when that happens. :D That is, If I can take a router to it without the wood blowing up.

True. Wave a metal detector over it as well as the Indian Rosewood (Dalbergia latifolia) dining table we have happens to have random tacks stuck in weird places where they don't serve any use....! Must be some kind of tax writeoff.

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