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OK, I'm not one of the best when it comes to build threads, but as I already does this in a lokal guitar forum for the customer I might at well share with you guys too.

This is a build based on my NorthStar body. However it is going to be a headless guitar with compound scale (fanned frets) and 8-Stings. Oh, and compound radius too. Here's a drawing

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Body wood, Brazilian cedar

Body top, Masur Birch, a quite common birch burl in Finland and Sweden

Neck is going to be multi laminated, with a lot of things going on, but mainly maple with mahogany stringer

The customer got to choose from one of these striped mahogany fretboards

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Body being glued up

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EDIT:Forgot, hardware from fellow Swede Ola Strandberg and it will also have an EndurNeck profile, that Ola is kind enough to let me license for this build. Or anyone that just pay his quite reasonable fee.

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Anyway, won't be any funky colors visible in the end. The epoxy just arrived and I aim to finish the pickups today. First, get all things you need together. This stuff cures in 3-5 minutes so you don'

A quick trip to the band saw to remove most of the excess And another trip to the router table to clean everything up

This is a bit of a "magic" moment for me every time I can attach the neck to the body for the first time. Its like it's becoming an instrument in that moment. Looking very strange with that "head".

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Body left to dry

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while I turn my attention to the top. First clean it up a bit on the planer

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The burl makes the birch extremely hard. So hard, in fact, that the band saw didn't had enough power to complete the job. So I had to hand saw it, quite a bit of work...

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After even more cleaning up with the Wagner Safe-T and the planer:

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Starting to work on the fretboard. For custom compound scales I print the CAD and glue it to the board

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Clamp the board to a table, clamp a steel ruler right up to the printed line, score the wood with a sharp knife.

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I then continue with to a thin saw. This saw is thinner than the fret saw, so thin that it tracks the knife cut good but wide enough to give the fret saw enough guidance later on

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And then it's time for the fret saw

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Cutting of the excess 1

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Cutting of the excess 2

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A bit of cleaning up on the belt sander and you can see what fretboard the customer chose

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Fret board cornea rounded over

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I use the router table, a flush trim bit and a template with a 16mm radius

I rout for the truss rod on the router table, first the narrower 6mm rout all along the truss rod length.

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and then a 8 mm bit for the adjustment nut of the trussrod

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a nice and tight fit

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As I have more compound radius fretboards coming up I decided it was finally time to build a radius jig. I opted for the on-top-of-the-router-table-version. As it was the first test I did a very "ghetto" style hinge.That will be upgraded before next use.

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16-20" radius done in a few minutes. On the other hand it took me three hours to build the jig...

Here you can see how the bit sits inside a tube that steers the jig.

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The surface of the fretboard is a bit rough, bit I don't think it takes more than a few minutes of sanding to clean this up.

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OH, this is how I made the neck blank (totally forgot to share that):

I glue thin maple and walnut veneers, 0.5mm thick to 0.5mm thick graphite, one on each side.

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This is the mahogany used. I almost feel bad using a flame mahogany for this...

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I then glue the thin laminates to the mahogany. The square steel tubes are used as clamping cauls throughout the process to ensure perfecty straight pieces.

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I now have pre-fab stringers with thin brown, thin black, thin white, 5mm brown, thin white, thin black and finally thin brown color. Two of those get laminated between flame maple.

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the walnut didn't became as visible as I had hoped, but I think it turned out pretty good anyway.

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I mark the outline of the body on the neck blank

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I drill and use a forester bit to make divits for the hardware to rest inside

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A bit of cleaning up on the other side. That Festool count sink (is that the right name) gotta be the best in the word. It centers perfectly and always leave a totally smooth bevel.

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Caulk in the truss rod slot to stop any vibrations. Tape to make sure I don't get caulk on the wood as that will stop the wood from adhering.

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Press the truss rod in, remove excess caulk, remove tape

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Now the freeboard is being glued to the neck blank in the usual fashion, using small nails in the fet slots as guides

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I use a LMII aluminum beam as clamping caul. This is after all the clamps have been removed.

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I always use epoxy for fretboards as I don't want to have any water there that can potentially cup the fretboard.

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A quick trip to the band saw to remove most of the excess

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And another trip to the router table to clean everything up

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Oh, my bad, Striped ebony, not mahogany! I don't think I would trust mahogany to hold the frets in and certainly not to stand up to the wear and tear of long time fretboard action.

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A bit more work done

I glue the top with a new toy, the LMI Plate Joining jig.

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I will write a review of this tool when I'm done testing it but I can give away the biggest benefit compared to my old method of clamping batons to the work bench and gluing the tops there: I can put the workpiece away while curing and free up the space on my bench for other work

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And then its time for fret markers. The customer only wants side markers as the fretboard looks so nice. A center finder ruler is great for finding the right spot

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A simple makeshift jig for drilling all holes in a straight line

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I'm using 4mm aluminium dots. I cut those from a rod, glue them in with super glue and use a small hammer to tap them in place

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Fast forward in time (about two hours for the glue in the top joint to dry). I band saw the top to rough size and shape and sand the gluing surface completely flat.

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Titebond! Looks a bit like a christmas gingerbread...

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and lots of clamps

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Now that has to cure over night. Next step is to sand the top to final thickness, levelness and smoothness (lots of "-ness" there). Then sit back and wait for the hardware to arrive.

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Love the top resawing setup :D

Yeah, less is more, or something like that.

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I totally forgot that I had some spalted Masur Birch to ping to you Peter! Yipes. The stuff I have is far softer than the "normal" Birch because of the spalting.

Love that neck blank. Pinstripes are always a classy touch.

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I totally forgot that I had some spalted Masur Birch to ping to you Peter! Yipes. The stuff I have is far softer than the "normal" Birch because of the spalting.

Love that neck blank. Pinstripes are always a classy touch.

Thanks, I had also totally forgot about that. Well you'll have to bring those and yourself over to Stockholm some time!

Wow, awesome work!

Such a very nice top and fretboard. Looking forward for more pictures.

Thanks!

Dang you and your easy access to masur birch!!!! Gorgeous!

Chris

Thanks! Thats one of the few benefits from living in cold scandinavia...

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Body cleaned up, from out of the clamps via band sawing to sanded with robo sander and top sanded smooth and wetted with naphtha

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