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Rattle Can Finish - removing overspray from dyed top


Mad Mux
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Hello all DIYers, new to the forum, and new to forums in general, so not sure if I'm doing this the right way.  Please forgive my rattle-can tastes on what appears to be a champagne forum, but I need some advice.

Finally getting around to rattle can finishing my homebuilt Ric 300 lookalike bass body, chambered solid with maple tops. I dyed the maple tops amber first, then sprayed 3 or 4 coats of clear lacquer over that. Used light gray lacquer auto primer, then Duplicolor Flame red for the solid back and my first attempt at sunbursting. It actually looks OK, I think (The red is BRIGHT; I would have preferred the red a shade or two closer to brown, but hey....I'll be refining it several times throughout its life)....except the obvious places I used rattle can lids to suspend the spray shield over the top. Generally, that technique helped a lot getting the sunburst onto the edges, and protecting from drips (some Duplicolor cans do, some don't), but I did not count on that much "underspray", so you can clearly see the amber circles where the lids were.

If I can sand the overspray out WITHOUT getting into the amber dye, then the second attempt will be easy, and I won't use can lids again!

Question is: what grit should I start with to try to sand out the red over/underspray, but without cutting below the clearcoat and into the amber dye? Should I wet or dry sand? Circular motion or straight, with the grain?
 

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Hi and welcome :)

I'm no expert with paint spray (no - let me be more specific.  I'm no expert, period), but if it was me, I would use 2000 grit used wet, or alternatively a very fine scotchbrite, again used wet.  The alternative is a VERY light wipe with a cloth moistened with thinners

Other views, anyone?

Andy

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On 1/6/2016 at 3:44 AM, Andyjr1515 said:

Hi and welcome :)

I'm no expert with paint spray (no - let me be more specific.  I'm no expert, period), but if it was me, I would use 2000 grit used wet, or alternatively a very fine scotchbrite, again used wet.  The alternative is a VERY light wipe with a cloth moistened with thinners

Other views, anyone?

Andy

This is going to be the way to go.

SR

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Thanks, gents.  I was thinking to start with 1000, but I'll try 2000 first....it can't hurt, if I'm getting nowhere I can drop down to 1500 or 1200, and as you say, try fine steel wool as well.  Thanks...wish me luck...I'll post results, if they're presentable.

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