Jump to content

Egg White as a clear grain filler


Recommended Posts

Has anyone ever used this?  It was a tip I picked up from an acoustic builder - in terms of clear grain filling.  I was led to believe it was an old classical guitar technique....

I've tried it on a couple of guitars but both were in a rush so I didn't pay much attention to how it fared with other clear fillers, but it did certainly work just as well as, say, Birchwood Casey Sealer Filler.  I might try it on the Dreadnought acoustic...Ill pay a bit more attention to how it fares.

Anyone else heard of it or used it?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, curtisa said:

Have heard of it, but never used it myself. From what I understand it seems to be a more 'traditional' grain filling method employed by classical guitar builders,

Yes - I'm sure the guy referred to classical guitars.

i think it's worth a try, the sonic requirements and look is not so different between a dreadnought acoustic and a classical.  If it's rubbish, I can always just sand it back off. 

 I'll post the results and first impressions :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 months later...
On 07/03/2016 at 11:09 AM, ScottR said:

I'm really interested in how you avoid the rotten egg smell over time.:P

SR

The idea that a raw egg will rot is true but misleading; kept in the shell for a few weeks, it'll end up smelling funny--but out of the shell and at room temperature/humidity, the moisture content of the white will evaporate long before it has a chance to rot, so it's essentially fragrance-free. I believe the use of egg-white as a groundcoat/grain filler originated with violins, and I've used it for that purpose in the past with great results.

Edited by LethbridgeMI
It's late and I'm bad at typing.
  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 7 months later...

I've heard Sully on The Luthierist podcast talk about using it himself as a grain filler and having good results. But it think I'll stick with my elmers wood grain filler and a little water, but it's good to know that if I run out of the elmers the replacement is only as far away as the refrigerator.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, Shay said:

I've heard Sully on The Luthierist podcast talk about using it himself as a grain filler and having good results. But it think I'll stick with my elmers wood grain filler and a little water, but it's good to know that if I run out of the elmers the replacement is only as far away as the refrigerator.

Yes - I think you are right to.  I'm not convinced it is any better than any of the others I've used for general grain fill.  Maybe for acoustic tops, but even there the moisture causes its own issues... but as you say, nice to know in times of crisis it's only a few steps away :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I wonder which part of the white is most useful.....when I make poached eggs, I crack the egg into a spaghetti spoon so that the thin runny part of the white separates from the gelatinous part around the yolk. It makes the eggs far more presentable as less "whispy". If the thin part is best, I have craploads of that going to waste each weekend. The cats can't eat it since it turns them into furry shit cannons.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...