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New build, makin' it up as I go....


ScottR
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The lacquer has been curing for a week. Before it gets any harder, I'm going to blend it into the neck, which got a few coats of oil 3 or 4 weeks ago. Here the masking is peeled away.

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I put some lacquer thinner on a rag and scrubbed at the edges of this. It cut the clear some but was not getting all of that edge knocked off. So I sprayed some Behlen Jet spray bluch remover on the rag and that worked like a charm.

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After a week of curing, I like to break the surface of the clear and help it outgas.

Before:

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SR

 

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I take some 400 grit 7X 3M paper and cut a  couple sheets to fit a foam sanding block. Then I rub the faces of those sheets together. This knocks the sharp edges of the grit off and leaves paper that cuts more like 600 or 800 grit. But the spacing of the grit is still 400 and the bottom line is it barely loads up with sanding dust at all. And it does not leave deep sanding scratches. It does do a nice job of gently leveling orange peel, thick areas, dust nibs and the like without cutting so fast you worry about sanding through.

So......after:

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And back to hanging and curing for another week.

SR

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18 hours ago, ScottR said:

I take some 400 grit 7X 3M paper and cut a  couple sheets to fit a foam sanding block. Then I rub the faces of those sheets together. This knocks the sharp edges of the grit off and leaves paper that cuts more like 600 or 800 grit. But the spacing of the grit is still 400 and the bottom line is it barely loads up with sanding dust at all. And it does not leave deep sanding scratches. It does do a nice job of gently leveling orange peel, thick areas, dust nibs and the like without cutting so fast you worry about sanding through.

SR

OK, first rate tip here! Sanding a finish is one of the parts of a build that I really look for ways to streamline the process (because I hate it!)

I'm gonna give this a shot :)

 

I really like how this build is turning out. You do as well making it up as you go along as many do with careful pre-planning :)

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9 minutes ago, Skyjerk said:

OK, first rate tip here! Sanding a finish is one of the parts of a build that I really look for ways to streamline the process. I'm gonna give this a shot :)

 

I really like how this build is turning out. You do as well making it up as you go along as many do with careful pre-planning :)

Thanks Chris,

Making it up as I go may be a little misleading. I use pretty much the same construction on all my builds, so a lot of the steps were pretty much a given. I calculated the neck angle when I got to that step and did sketch out a body design when it got to be time to cut the body shape out......so yeah, I did make a fair number of decisions just in time for that stage of construction. 

I gotta admit, part of the fun of doing this was to poke at Prostheta a bit. He likes to put together very regimented plans,with all the engineering figured out and tested in advance and uses that to make beautiful and perfectly repeatable guitars and basses (and lovely furniture as well). Carl and I have a running dialog because our design methods are the polar opposite of each other. 

Both yield up nice guitars, and we both like to point out the differences as an illustration to others of how many "right" ways there are to get the job done.

SR

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Like our respective climates, I seem to be somewhere in between you two regarding my process :)

 

Since my build are almost always neck-through, I obviously need to work out all the geometry ahead of time before I cut any wood because once the blank is cut theres no changing neck angles. Trying to wing it would likely produce a fair amount of firewood :)

So the core of my builds are all very strictly planned and executed.

Everything from that point on is a lot more "from the hip". Final top carves, neck carves, pickup locations, etc

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11 minutes ago, Prostheta said:

So you built an entire guitar to rib me a little, Scott? :mellow:

Not at all. I'm getting a fine guitar out of the deal too.:D

I did knowingly go into the project with the understanding that everything about it would be the opposite of the way you would do it, and thought maybe it would provoke some of those illustrative conversations about the numerous ways of doing things. Purely as an educational opportunity, of course.:)

SR

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11 minutes ago, komodo said:

I leave for a couple days and look what you do. Beautiful build Scott. I'm not sure which I like better, the glossy or the sanded matte finish!

Cheers Jeff!

A couple of days eh? I need to take a look at that calendar you are using.:P Thanks and I know what you mean about the matte versus gloss. Every time I get one to this stage I think the same thing, that matte looks cool. But I can't not at least take a look at what it looks like all leveled and polished to a high gloss. And of course once I do that it's too late.

SR

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