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Abralon pads and Abranet are my favourites also....I use Abranet almost daily at work. The only downside to Abralon is that they round over sharp edges very easily thanks to their conformity. Things like the edges of cavities, drilled holes and the like. For the most part it isn't too much of a problem if ferrules are going in, or that edge is going to be covered.

Good idea about the sanding sticks!

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Good point, I could also observe this, especially at the electronics cavity. I don't like that round over where I want to get sharp edges. Any tricks to mitigate this effect? Guess it should already b

Routed the neck pocket and neck pu cavity... and determined the hipshot bridge position and drilled the string-through holes: Then the binding channel was routed. Specially for this task I'v

Then I've designed and made a pickguard and trussrod cover out of a aluminium sheet (1.5mm). Brought it into shape with a fretsaw, files and sandpaper. Lastly I've created longitudinal sanding marks o

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Indeed, absolutely top drawer stuff.

All machine-borne sandpapers, pads, etc. will round over edges as there is flex in both the mounting pads and the abrasive itself. I use the Mirka DEROS almost daily at work (I promise to review this very soon), and we use the "pad saver" interfaces between the mounting pad and the abrasive. Even with thin Mirka Gold stearated discs, there is a tendency for the pad to conform to shapes and over edges. Mirka Abranet does this a little more, and of course the foam-backed Abralon pads do it a LOT.

The two solutions I use:

  • Keep ahold of scrap cut from the workpiece, so that you can place it next to it when sanding. This only prevents angling/tipping over edges, and doesn't help too much with pads conforming and rounding over.
  • Better ROS usage. The machines sand more or less equally from the edge to the centre of the disc, as the orbit is equal at all points. Don't let the machine "hang" over the sides of the workpiece when doing edges. Having maximum pad-to-workpiece contact at all times reduces edge softening.

The gold standard is to use a hard sanding block of course. If you specifically require very sharp edges, that's the way to go. In general I think that most of the solution is in improving machine usage. This is entirely why I prefer the 125mm discs over 150mm discs.

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What a stunning build. Like everyone else, I'm really into how methods and clean design. The pickguard really finishes this off nicely, but it's the contours that make this stand out for me.
 

I was wondering about the headstock logo. Is that a waterslide decal buried under 2K or did you do something else?

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Thanks! :)

On 23.10.2017 at 6:45 PM, Prostheta said:
  • Better ROS usage. The machines sand more or less equally from the edge to the centre of the disc, as the orbit is equal at all points. Don't let the machine "hang" over the sides of the workpiece when doing edges. Having maximum pad-to-workpiece contact at all times reduces edge softening.

The gold standard is to use a hard sanding block of course. If you specifically require very sharp edges, that's the way to go. In general I think that most of the solution is in improving machine usage. This is entirely why I prefer the 125mm discs over 150mm discs.

This was for sure a point I did not think about enough as I used the ROS... but next time, thanks very much! ;)

Why ever the sanding block method did not work very well for me this time. Had some issues with big ugly scratches although I've used quality wet sandpaper, soaked it in water (and a drip of detergent) several hours, and took care about not to fold the sandpaper on the sanding block edges. As I've once lacquered a guitar that was no issue... :unsure:

6 hours ago, Woden said:

I was wondering about the headstock logo. Is that a waterslide decal buried under 2K or did you do something else?

As you say: waterslide decal under 2K

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Thanks, Seb. Classy logo you did there.

I've just got some decal paper to try out but I'm also experimenting with a laser cut rubber stamp for my signature logo. I figured the stamp gives me as many colour options as I want and it's just a case of finding the right ink/paint to use with it.

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On 10/25/2017 at 1:10 AM, seb said:

Why ever the sanding block method did not work very well for me this time. Had some issues with big ugly scratches although I've used quality wet sandpaper, soaked it in water (and a drip of detergent) several hours, and took care about not to fold the sandpaper on the sanding block edges.

 

Chamfer the edges of the block ;-)

 

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Congrats on the GOTM win!!!! :D

I know it's not formally announced yet, but the voting is stated as closed and you seem to have the most votes so I'm putting two and two together... :thumb:

Superb build and great, great result.

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