Jump to content

Misc Stuff about Life. Part XII


Recommended Posts

In this case the steel was installed in 2012. No steps were taken to properly seal the edge where the pool meets the concrete deck surface and then they put limestone paving stones on top of the concrete to effectively hide the fact that high chlorine pool water was draining through in improper places.

 Now of course they have to remove all the limestone and seal the gap. It's just sad that these steps were skipped because the owner likely accepted the lowest bid.

 To make it worse, the engineer is half-assing the repairs to cut down costs for the contractor. He keeps talking about it being "overbuilt" and some members are being installed right up against the corroded members without rust removal at his insistence. 

 "Rust needs moisture to spread and we'll be sealing the deck".

Okay, but this is Texas. It's humid and one column actually filled up with water from nothing but condensation and froze, bowing out the tube steel. 

 It's ridiculous. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 2.1k
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

How much of an awesome dude is Mike Ve  sent me a couple of lovely one piece curly tops all the way from Arizona. I've already put one of them to use on my upcoming SG2000 build. In other news, I've f

So it's official. Busy times ahead.

Greetings from Opatija, Croatia. I decided to quit my job and change companies in hope I find people with better work ethics. Few months ago I couldn't imagine quitting cause I love the folks I work w

Posted Images

"Overbuilt to standard" eh? One would think that doing a job correctly was pouring money down the drain and in fact, not doing one's job correctly. It fucking cranks me when I am expected to lower basic standards or cut corners. It pretty much undermines all qualifications, experience and sense, not to mention pride and the ability to stand beside one's work. Like I'm sure I've mentioned before, if something I do meets my personal standard (which isn't a measure of arrogance, just basic box-ticking) then I'll write my name in it somewhere. Because I know.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey, I've been in a funny situation. I changed my password then forgot it so I've been locked out but luckily I wrote it in my diary

One day I spotted this and have been wanting to comment. The Number Plate on this Doomsday Truck is Western Australian. Its no big deal but bit of a surprise to me

456278608_ScreenShot2021-04-12at3_40_16pm.png.7168db067e73dbc683c3668b32618ad1.png

 

On 2/20/2021 at 3:02 AM, Prostheta said:

Looks good, but it'd be wasted on me, that's for sure. I would however not say no to an end-of-timer Unimog crew cab like this:

 

I'm really unsure (actually, I'm sure) whether or not Mercedes will take this into EV territory. You could easily get weekly shopping in that. Maybe convert the back into sauna. I keep trying to convince Nina that this would be fantastic purely since she complains about not being able to see over the bonnet and where the corners are. In a Unimog, that hardly becomes an issue.

 

 

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't think its the chlorine, specifically, per se, at all. I would bet hard cash currency its a saltwater pool and its the salt generation system that is causing the problem. If a deck is involved, there may be poor grounding/bonding issues at hand, so there's your shitty contractor work coupled with a saltwater pool situation.

But its generally not the fault of the steel itself. Or having to seal the pool shell, although that is a helpful option, most don't do that. Saltwater pools, done correctly, use what's called a 'sacrificial anode' made of a soft metal so the system attacks 'it'. Its a protective measure that 'gives itself up' thus saving any other metal components attached to or near the pool. If the pool is not using a sacrificial anode (there are several varieties, and they're all pretty cheap), and the pool has a saltwater generator system (wildly popular these days), it will attack the nearest (and softest) metal, all of it, and artificially age it prematurely.

On another note: Limestone and saltwater generators are a horrific combination together, but its done all the time. And when the limestone deteriorates in a few scant years, and the customer wants answers, the finger-pointing begins, and no one takes responsibility, the customer has to suck it up.

The porosity of the limestone 'holds' the saline-oriented  splashout and just destroys itself. Common problem, actually, that is not widely circulated as limestone is a popular choice, and so are salt generators now. Just a terrible combination, and most contractors are clueless about such interactions.

Not all pools have saltwater generators on them, although in the past 10 years or so they have become wildly popular. So much so that the problems associated with them (as I mentioned) get blamed on chlorine, when pools that do not have salt generators on them never have these kinds of problems. And up until about 10 years ago, the vast, vast majority of residential pools did not have salt generators on them and never suffered these kinds of problems. The average residential pool that is saltwater equipped takes about +/- 1000lbs. of salt to operate correctly.

Its the salt, 90% of the time, and the way they formulate the salt generator systems to operate, that is the problem. Not chlorine.

 

So the typical scenario goes like this: Cheap-ass pool contractor subs out all the individual pieces of the construction. Since they're cheap-ass, they're generally stupid too, so not even they are aware of intrinsic-related issues like this, but the responsibility truly stops with them, tho they never admit to it. The decking contractor doesn't know shit about pools or chlorine or salt system interactions, they know deck and patios and they do what they're told to do. Now, there are shitty/stupid/cheap patio contractors too, that's where poor-ass bonding/grounding situations combine with the stupid-ass pool contractor who doesn't know anything about saltwater applications.

And BAM! All hell breaks loose, primarily because the pool contractor doesn't give a damn and doesn't shoulder any knowledge except the list of subs he has in his back pocket. That's all the shitty contractors know, is their list of subs for what area they sold the job, and collecting those draws on time or they stop the job, that's really all they do most of the time. The good pool contractors have most of the staff in-house, those are the guys who build quality, but they come at a substantially higher cost.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Chlorine is caustic, by itself, no doubt, I've seen pails of it blow up.

But salt is an even more corrosive animal and lies beneath the surface that no one wants to talk about, generally.

Most people in general know chlorine, especially open or loose containers, is dangerous and/or corrosive.

Far fewer people understand the complexities and corrosive dangers of salt.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

First day of eased lockdown restrictions today, pub gardens open, outdoor tourism etc. My Mrs decided to take our 3 year old and her two nieces over to an outdoor adventure place for young kids, gets back to the car and some arsehole has ripped the number plates off her car, rings me so I report it to police and I go straight out and get her some new plates made and got them fitted this evening. I don't really care about the reg plates, the £40 that it's cost me or the few hours of my time it's wasted, but pissed that someone would mess with the mrs car when it's just her and young kids, just so they can rob some petrol with someone elses plates. The plates are flagged on ANPR now so she's probably going to get stopped every time she passes a police car, I'm wondering if I will save a lot of bother if I just get her a new registration. Arseholes.

Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, Drak said:

Far fewer people understand the complexities and corrosive dangers of salt.

Car owners in snowy countries know that too well... The salt that is spread on the highways when there's snow and the temperature isn't too much below freezing point. Oh boy does it stick on the surfaces! Just liquid enough to be raised as mist by the tires of the previous car, instantly drying on your car. And the same mist sneaks into every slit and slot under your car, living with the weather. A drive-in car wash isn't a solution either as it's still too cold to leave the freshly washed car outside, the doors will freeze stuck.

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, westhemann said:

This being on top of a hill  that empties into Lake Austin, I'd be surprised if a saltwater pool were legal. Austin really has a lot of restrictions about lake pollution. 

Yes sir, the bluest of cities in a red state. Keep Austin weird. :)

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

They lost that years ago after Katrina. It WAS kitschy but friendly. Now it's inundated with tent cities and full of crime.

 Between Houston, New Orleans,  and California it's an entirely new population. 

  • Like 1
  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
31 minutes ago, westhemann said:

Such beautiful trees out here... a little spikey though.

 The hand is just for size reference. The scratches are from playing with my cat, not the tree.

20210413_182509.jpg

20210413_182400.jpg

20210413_182418.jpg

Mesquite trees, :) Miss being out in West Texas where they are in plenty of supply.

mk

Link to post
Share on other sites

Not mesquite. These are apparently honey locusts, but everyone locally calls them bois d arc, or bodark...

 An incorrect designation,  but regardless.... they are very difficult to handle. They actually grow thorns on their thorns.

 Mesquite would be more useful 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, westhemann said:

Not mesquite. These are apparently honey locusts, but everyone locally calls them bois d arc, or bodark...

 An incorrect designation,  but regardless.... they are very difficult to handle. They actually grow thorns on their thorns.

 Mesquite would be more useful 

Honey locust has a nice looking very hard wood .... and goes to great lengths to keep it. Wicked thorns. You are correct though, it's not bois d' ark or bodark. That's another name for Osage orange or hedge apple or plain hedge where I grew up..

Honey locust burns nearly as hot as mesquite, but not as tasty smoke wise. Bodark burns hotter still, but its smoke is somewhat toxic and not safe to cook over. Does a good job of repelling bugs though. Where I grew up folks used to break the hedge apples and spread them around their foundations as a bug repellent. Squirrels love to eat them.....but still seem to get fleas.

Squirrels are weird.

SR

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes  you are correct that is honey locust. I should have looked at it closer from the far away pics. LOL I saw the thorns and went Mesquite. LOL

I agree Mesquite more useful. at least you can BBQ with it. LOL

MK

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, westhemann said:

A bigger backhoe would be better. 

20210421_132652.jpg

@westhemann, At least you are on some property to do that with. :)

I have been looking at 10 to 20 acres around Evant between Hamilton and Lampasas. I so want to get away from the city. :)

mk

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Had to check for Dime Box. Surprisingly it's surrounded by places that I've either visited or at least driven by: Berlin, Manheim, Milano...

  • Like 1
  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...