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neck construction


MikeB
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hi,

i wanted to know what glue you use to glue the laminates of the neck together? i was thinking Cascamite, but i dont know if its made any more..

also can i build the neck and attach the fretboard unfretted, then profile ie taper etc... then sand the radius and fret the neck and inlay...

thanks alot again!!

Mike :D

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thanks for the speedy replies guys!!! i had been confused about the truss rod for a while but i got it a few days ago, and im all clear on it :D

im doing teak fingerboard, teak is quite oily... never heard of Gorilla Glue.... any other name it may go under?

thanks

mike

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Northern Ireland tho :D but dad is gonna go lookin for some glue tomorrow, we def have titebond, but he used Cascamite on the stairs he made 20 years ago, and they are as strong as ever, so if i can im gonna go with it.

btw... how thick should a neck be at the heel joint minus the fingerboard, bearing in mind im using a modern truss rod etc...

thanks

mike

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how thick should a neck be at the heel joint minus the fingerboard, bearing in mind im using a modern truss rod etc...

That seems to be a very commonly asked question. The standard disclaimer would be that it depends on a number of things such as the neck joint depth, bridge height, ...

If you aren't doing anything different from a strat, Ibanez RG, ... style gutiar then 3/4" is about right (not including the fretboard). Otherwise, other dimensions and attributes of the guitar are needed.

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QUOTE (krazyderek @ Jan 29 2004, 03:10 PM)

QUOTE (westhemann @ Jan 29 2004, 06:09 PM)

inlay first,then radius and fret the board,right? 

i think LGM recommended radiusing first then inlaying to avoid sand thru, 

well he would know

Isn't it a bit hard if you're going to use a dremel/whatever to cut the little pockets for the inlays if you're not working on a flat surface?

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Northern Ireland tho :D but dad is gonna go lookin for some glue tomorrow, we def have titebond, but he used Cascamite on the stairs he made 20 years ago, and they are as strong as ever, so if i can im gonna go with it.

Gorilla Glue

Look at Home Improvement centers. the glue itself is a Polyurethane Glue. There may be other brands but Gorilla Glue is the only name brand that comes to mind

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I have started using Titebond Extend. It's not that Titebond I or II are giving me problems - it's just that it is supposed to be more creep resistant and is designed for laminating things like stair railings and other things that are under strain for long periods of time. The only place I have found it around me is WoodCraft.

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Concerning the inlays: So far I only inlayed on flat fingerboards and radiused afterwards. It is really a question of how thick your inlays are. If they are very thin you'll have to radius first, as you'll sand trough them the other way. If you have to route the inlay cavities after radiusing, then you'll have to get/make a base for your dremel which is wider then your fingerboard, so that you can put two high enough pieces of wood to the left and the right of the fingerboard and guide the dremel on them. If possible I recommend to radius the fingerboard afterwards, as routing good inlay cavities on flat fingerboard is difficult enough....

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I've done several fretboards with inlay but I have never done inlayed before radiusing the fretboard. I would think that you would have the same issue of sanding through in either case since the inlay material has to be flush with the top of the fretboard in both cases. Maybe I'm forgetting something - but it has worked fine for me.

You don't have to use rails to use the dremel when routing. It works just fine with the base that stewmac sells and just ride it along the radiused edge of the fretboard. I haven't tried this with extreme cases like a 7.5" radius fretboard but for 10" it works just fine. I think LGM wrote something concerning this and I seem to remember his experience being similar. The rails aren't a bad idea, but they certainly are not needed. Also, keep in mind that my inlay has only gone to within .25" of the edge so maybe if you are going all the way out there would be more of a need for something like this.

Not trying to pick a fight Marcel, just trying to give a alternate view.

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Stupid me....:D You are correct daveg....inlaying after radiusing does NOT resolve the issue of inlays being to thin. Somehow I made a logical error as I though about the issue as I wrote the first post.

Concerning the rails:

I would use the rails in this case anyway as I think you would really need a very small dremel base in order to precisely guide it on the radiused fingerboard.

If you have a neck with a tight radius and a big router base the router base will wiggle on the surface and this is should really be a problem if you are cutting difficult inlays. If you just do simple Gibson style inlays it might not be a problem though.

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