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Bizman62
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Just now, ScottR said:

I beg to differ.....

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I think it is a very attractive combination, sounds great too!

SR

(dalek font) does not compute... illogical... self destruct in 3.... 2.... 1....

those are some lovelies.  I bet if you posted them on the gear page you'd get all kinds of comments about how they don't sound like teles (hehe)

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2 hours ago, ADFinlayson said:

what wood is that on the top?

That's poplar that was felled in the centre of the town some years ago.  I asked for the first metre, it was 70 cm in diameter. The colouring is due to it standing in my yard all winter and half of the summer, most likely some fungi.

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  • 2 weeks later...

After yesterday's Scotch tasting I wasn't at my perkiest this morning. Not only did I appear late in the class, I also spent quite some time helping other builders. But I'm happy with what I could do: I rerouted the neck and pickup cavities a couple of mm deeper and the fretboard now seems to be at the right height compared to the bridge. I also finished radiusing the fretboard and went through some grits up to 6000 to give it a nice sheen. The buttons are semi-transparent again. I also applied some Crimson penetrating Guitar Finishing Oil over the dusty board to fill the pores. Guess I should have made a proper slurry and spread it generously and let dry, then again the previous fretboards I've made of that very same blank have their pores unfilled without issues in playability. I'm more concerned about the buttons. Now that they're polished they have a friction similar to a lacquered neck. Most likely that won't be an issue either.

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Not much done today, routed the binding channel, bent the rosewood offcuts of the sides of the acoustic of a fellow builder and glued them in place. The horny side bent smoothly but the upper side cracked a couple of times. You can see it on the upper bout. Some wood dust and glue is required on the top, the sides succeeded better.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Some minor progress today as well as some drawback. The bearing of the router bit dug into the soft poplar so badly that I had to resand the sides. That made the binding very thin. I'm currently pondering whether I'd leave it as is or redo the binding channel deeper and get some fake tortoise shell. The latter would match with the buttons...

After countersinking the control knob cavities to make them level with the control cavity I then routed the latter deeper. Despite several measurings I routed it too deep so I had to add some material. Luckily there was a piece of 3 mm Baltic Birch plywood in the trash bin! As the poplar is very soft I had already thought about laminating a piece of 0.55 mm birch veneer cross grained to the bottom of the cavity so actually I could as well say that this went better than originally planned!

Or should I just say that I added a piece of Tone and Volume wood to the cavity?

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Towards the end of the week I was a little afraid that our class would have been canceled due to Covid having been more active in our town lately. Fortunately not, but we all wore masks.

In the morning before really waking up I came to the idea of using brass nails instead of white plastic to fill the button holes as that would tie the buttons to the brass tube side dots. The holes were 1.5 mm wide and the solid brass nails were 1.8 mm thick. I nipped the caps off of 10 nails, stuck the sharp end to the chuck of a hand drill and rolled the nails between a folded piece of sandpaper. Not only did that reduce the diameter, it also roughened the surface for better glueing. After filing the nails flush I then reradiused the neck, sanding through the grits up to 6000. The photos don't do justice to the shininess of the brass...

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  • 2 weeks later...
  • 1 month later...

There's going to be somewhat of a hiatus. The community college sent an SMS saying that due to Covid-19 there won't be a spring season. I've got some tools but the only place I have is the kitchen table and power tool generated wood dust isn't my favourite spice. Let's see...

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12 hours ago, Bizman62 said:

power tool generated wood dust isn't my favourite spice

yup, that's why I also have a hiatus between october and march. Need proper weather conditions to work outside...

probably mentioned already but what kind of course are you doing? is it an 'official' luthery school?

 

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4 hours ago, 10pizza said:

probably mentioned already but what kind of course are you doing? is it an 'official' luthery school?

I don't know how it should be translated. There's several versions, none of which seem to perfectly fit: Community College, Adult Education Centre etc. Anyhow, in most towns here they organize spare time courses around various subjects from languages to dancing to woodworking. The skill level of the teachers can vary from advanced hobbyists or native speakers to trained professionals. We're lucky as our tutor is a trained and qualified Master Luthier who has been in the business since 1984. For many of us the course is some sort of counterbalancing therapy after a week at work. So no, it's not an 'official' luthiery school, we don't get diplomas nor do we qualify as luthiers.

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It's a great shame that your course is being interrupted.

That said, your demonsrated skills mean that, with just a few tools, I am sure you can still make progress, albeit slower. 

Decent time to practice and learn the more subtle arts of chisel sharpening, plane set up and so on?  Most of my chisels and planes are old castaways...but steel is steel and they work just as well as they did when they were new 50 years ago!  Renovating an old plane with a file, some emery cloth and a cheap glass chopping board is a very satisfying thinv to do :)

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Thanks for your encouraging words @Andyjr1515!

Unfortunately it's not about tools, it's about space. Actually I have quite a good variety of power tools but no dust extraction. And it's cold outside! Unfortunately most of my hand tools are pure Poundshop quality, creating a burr to a freshly sharpened blade at first stroke on wood!

But there's light at the end of the tunnel and it's not a train! A fellow builder just sent an email, telling that the public pay-by-hour workshop is still open. The same mail was sent to some regulars and the tutor so maybe we'll see some progress during the winter!

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1 hour ago, Bizman62 said:

Thanks for your encouraging words @Andyjr1515!

Unfortunately it's not about tools, it's about space. Actually I have quite a good variety of power tools but no dust extraction. And it's cold outside! Unfortunately most of my hand tools are pure Poundshop quality, creating a burr to a freshly sharpened blade at first stroke on wood!

But there's light at the end of the tunnel and it's not a train! A fellow builder just sent an email, telling that the public pay-by-hour workshop is still open. The same mail was sent to some regulars and the tutor so maybe we'll see some progress during the winter!

Excellent news!

It's worth looking on ebay, junk shops, etc for old handtools - certainly for chisels and handplanes.  They are usually dirt cheap (although I think folks have started cottoning on to how valuable they still can be) and can often be restored relatively easily.

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5 hours ago, ADFinlayson said:

I think it's time you succumbed like the rest of us and build yourself a workshop

Easier said than done. Building a shed in the garden wouldn't require any licenses as long as it's below 6 m². Sheds like that aren't too expensive, about €1500. BUT: A shed with proper insulation and heating to be usable at this time a year would require much more. It's -22° at the moment and the forecast says -35° for the night. Getting it electrified for both heating and power tools couldnt be safely done with a 30 m long extension cord running across the yard!  I also have a "garage" between the sauna and the firewood storage (in the same building) but there's no electricity in that space. There's electric light at both ends of the building but I doubt the fuse and underground cable would be sufficient for both heating and power tools. And the garage is uninsulated as well, the large doors serving only for hiding purposes. So in any case building a warm workshop would cost about €5000 which is something I can't afford for just building experimental guitars.

I'd like to have that workshop, though.

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1 hour ago, Bizman62 said:

'd like to have that workshop, though

+1

same here, I have a room for doing setups etc in my garage which is heated, but not suited for using powertools. I'm thinking of asking my carpenter friend if I can use his workshop a couple of saturdays. Downside is I need to bring all my tools and can't combine it with keeping an eye on my kids 😉

Long term plan however is to build a new garage/shed/workshop but that'll be 5-10 yrs from now I'm afraid

 

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