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Lumberjack’s Blood Moon


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Yes, it's problematic. For one, colour matching becomes that much harder, for example in a simple Shaker door with two horizontal and vertical pieces. It looks different from different angles, especially with the 90°-oriented parts. I personally wouldn't go as far as calling it a fault, however when buying graded clear lumber it could be interpreted as such. As a material product it doesn't serve the end use, hence it is (I almost started describing this in Finnish) faulty or an exception that should be excluded. Generally it's not wasted, that much is a different matter. Calling it faulty doesn't mean it gets binned, it's simple faulty for that graded level of fault-free lumber.

It's hard to work with in comparison to straight-grained clear wood, so the working methods need to change. Even if it could be "gotten away with" in the end product, the working methods familiar to clear wood processing may not apply. It's a pain to plane, joint and shape thanks to the grain dipping in and out of the surface causing nice clear paths of short grain where cohesive strength drops below the point where cutters shear material, and instead push it free of the rest.

It's just wordplay for the most part, or at least our part. You wouldn't need to regard it as faulty unless you specifically ordered clear straight-grained lumber.

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15 minutes ago, Prostheta said:

Yes, it's problematic. For one, colour matching becomes that much harder, for example in a simple Shaker door with two horizontal and vertical pieces. It looks different from different angles, especially with the 90°-oriented parts. I personally wouldn't go as far as calling it a fault, however when buying graded clear lumber it could be interpreted as such. As a material product it doesn't serve the end use, hence it is (I almost started describing this in Finnish) faulty or an exception that should be excluded. Generally it's not wasted, that much is a different matter. Calling it faulty doesn't mean it gets binned, it's simple faulty for that graded level of fault-free lumber.

It's hard to work with in comparison to straight-grained clear wood, so the working methods need to change. Even if it could be "gotten away with" in the end product, the working methods familiar to clear wood processing may not apply. It's a pain to plane, joint and shape thanks to the grain dipping in and out of the surface causing nice clear paths of short grain where cohesive strength drops below the point where cutters shear material, and instead push it free of the rest.

It's just wordplay for the most part, or at least our part. You wouldn't need to regard it as faulty unless you specifically ordered clear straight-grained lumber.

perhaps 'less desireable' is  more the term... but at the cab shop I worked at ages ago... they'd set the heavily figured stuff aside and use it for bracing and such and that always made me sad!

30 minutes ago, Lumberjack said:

It actually came with the jeweler’s saw I bought for cutting inlays, the whole thing was quite cheap ($15-$20) but the jig and saw both work great! 
 

Sanded it flush this morning and thank God it turned out alright, this is still dry with no oil and I’m hoping that will help blend in my “fixes” even better. 
 

QXnUyZu.jpg

the little 'lines' between the A and M - how did you maintain those so nicely?  That really looks great.  well done.

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On 8/7/2020 at 2:35 PM, mistermikev said:

the little 'lines' between the A and M - how did you maintain those so nicely?  That really looks great.  well done.

The inlay was a single piece of wood to start, so those lines are just a single pass with the jeweler’s saw and as little sanding as I could get away with to smooth out the saw marks. The material between them is clear epoxy with a bunch of ebony sanding dust mixed in for color matching purposes, and it was pretty slow-curing so I had plenty of time to smudge it around till the lines looked right. 

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1 hour ago, Lumberjack said:

The inlay was a single piece of wood to start, so those lines are just a single pass with the jeweler’s saw and as little sanding as I could get away with to smooth out the saw marks. The material between them is clear epoxy with a bunch of ebony sanding dust mixed in for color matching purposes, and it was pretty slow-curing so I had plenty of time to smudge it around till the lines looked right. 

right on.  single pass with a jeweler's saw... that's a pretty steady pass.  nice work.

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Major shapes/contours roughed in, next step will likely be carving the neck. All the contours were cut free hand with dragon and shinto style rasps, which is... sort of fun?  What do you guys use for your larger carves?  I’ve been using rasps for the longest time, but I’ve been thinking of switching to angle grinders with sanding attachments, or maybe some air-powered rotary sanding tools like I’ve seen others use. 
 

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The sharp angle where the belly carve meets the upper horn was also part of the design for the blue guitar I built a little while ago, but I didn’t have the guts to keep it and I sanded it into a smoother shape because I thought it was a bit too much, sort of BC Rich-esque. I’m still not quite sure about it, but this is obviously a “pointy metal” style guitar so I’ve decided to keep it this time and see how I feel about it once the build is finished. 

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7 hours ago, Lumberjack said:

Major shapes/contours roughed in, next step will likely be carving the neck. All the contours were cut free hand with dragon and shinto style rasps, which is... sort of fun?  What do you guys use for your larger carves?  I’ve been using rasps for the longest time, but I’ve been thinking of switching to angle grinders with sanding attachments, or maybe some air-powered rotary sanding tools like I’ve seen others use. 

 

It depends on the placement, grain direction and how deeply it goes. If it's aligned with the grain and convex, I might rough out most of it with a spokeshave. Convex, and I rough in with chisels. Going from coarse to in-shape, I'd use rasps and coarse 80 grit Abranet on hard backing blocks, sticks, cylinders or whatever. From there it's the same, but purely sanding and the occasional file. The SG I did a while back was done this way, and I'll probably do the same for the contouring on my current bass build. There's a lot of convex stuff going on in that one.

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On 8/14/2020 at 6:01 PM, RonMay said:

Or an incurable medical condition.  :)

If your big honkin’ volute lasts for 4 or more hours please contact your doctor. 
 

On 8/14/2020 at 10:19 AM, ScottR said:

Now you need to carve your initials or logo in that volute.

SR

I won’t even try to pretend my volutes aren’t inspired by your work,  I love your volutes!  I decided on inlaying a medal in this one. 

mxMHaJ9.jpg

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9 hours ago, Lumberjack said:

 I decided on inlaying a medal in this one. 

 

Very nice, that looks great. That particular style of volute creates a great place for a logo or inlay as @sdshirtman told me a number of years ago.

I love that you like the way that volute looks and are using it in your own builds. Your version looks great.

SR

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10 hours ago, Lumberjack said:

I won’t even try to pretend my volutes aren’t inspired by your work,  I love your volutes!

@ScottR Same here, they are awesome ... I'm for sure going to shamelessly work one into my current build that has a teardrop shape featured - perfectly fits coincidentally for form & function

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10 hours ago, Lumberjack said:

My absolute favorite step in the build is dying the maple

Everyone should do this at least once. No matter how many you see or do, there are few things in a build that are more satisfying than making that figure come to life!

You do a masterful job of masking.....each time.

SR

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