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soapbarstrat
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I need a "tool" that doesn't exist. Problem is ,I tear off pieces of sandpaper and often tear off the exact part that has the grit number, then later I have to study the piece with no number on it, to try to figure out what grit it is.

It would be nice to have a little device, I could slide a piece of sandpaper in, and it would tell me what grit it is.

Snork, get to work on this :D

Or, if the the darn sandpaper companies would print the grit size smaller and reapeatedly all over the back of the sandpaper.

Takes a lot of time to do somthing like that myself with a pen.

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Well,

I just have a rack that all my grits sit in, and I make sure to only have one grit out at a time, then it goes back into that rack when I'm done with it. The ones that bug me are the discs I use on my random orbit, they don't have the grit printed at all, so you have to keep them organized right from the store which is great until the clerk tosses them all in the bag without keeping them separated.

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Well,

I just have a rack that all my grits sit in, and I make sure to only have one grit out at a time, then it goes back into that rack when I'm done with it. The ones that bug me are the discs I use on my random orbit, they don't have the grit printed at all, so you have to keep them organized right from the store which is great until the clerk tosses them all in the bag without keeping them separated.

Ha ! You think I could ever get THAT organized ? I should take photos of how "organized" my tools and supplies are. Sandpaper gets thrown into the 'sandpaper' drawer, where it gets to party down with all the other grits. One big happy abrasive orgy goin' on in that drawer, I have to assume.

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Well,

I just have a rack that all my grits sit in, and I make sure to only have one grit out at a time, then it goes back into that rack when I'm done with it. The ones that bug me are the discs I use on my random orbit, they don't have the grit printed at all, so you have to keep them organized right from the store which is great until the clerk tosses them all in the bag without keeping them separated.

That'swhat I do. I have like this file folder thing, you can probably get them at business stores, I mark each folder section with a grit number, and put each grit back in place once I'm finished. I used to do what soapbarstrat does, but it got out of hand.

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Awwwww come on, I want that machine. Don't we have at least one Homer Simpson type who can try to build this machine in his garage ?

I figure if they have machines that read finger-prints, they should be able to have one that can read abrasive grit size and amount.

I do sometimes write it on the paper, but just my luck I end up tearing just that part too before i realize it.

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The device would be impossible. When you use sandpaper you automatically begin to wear down and take off paricles, therefore a particle measurer and particle counter wouldn't work. Also, only grits that are like 600 or higher have a uniform grit, where there is the same amount of particles in the same concentration for every square milimeter. The lower grit is more like: "ya throw some glue and sand on there, whatever"

And brian, I have like 5 sheets of 800, i love the stuff, not too rough, not too fine, good for taking off small bits of wood atta time.

You guys are losers! I mean come on! You can usually tell the grits apart by colors. The lowere grits like 80 are allways brown, and etc. Also, just train your fingers. Maybe it's because i have sensitive fingers, but i can tell 1200 from 2000 or 80 from 100 any day just by feel.

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I just finished sorting out all my sandpaper from my last project. I can pretty much tell what it is by the feel, I have lots of sanding experience, except for the real fine grits like 1200 and up. I'm not sure exact grit numbers are all that important, all you really need is coarse, medium, fine and REAL fine, :D . Hell, a blind man can do it!

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i like 34 grit,, its nice for scaloping taking out the big stuff by hand,, its like rocks glued on paper

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I just finished sorting out all my sandpaper from my last project. I can pretty much tell what it is by the feel, I have lots of sanding experience, except for the real fine grits like 1200 and up. I'm not sure exact grit numbers are all that important, all you really need is coarse, medium, fine and REAL fine, B) . Hell, a blind man can do it!

And he can even tell you what dirty jokes they printed on the paper in braille :D

so long

ace

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And he can even tell you what dirty jokes they printed on the paper in braille

Though I hate saying this, I really did do it: LOL

All I have is 3 big folders (my dad bought the sandpaper in bulk about 20 years ago, its older than I am) of 120, 220, and 600. It's all we need.

Eventually, I will buy some 1500 or 2000, but again, just keep track by box and look.

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  • 2 years later...

man, i'm with the "feelies" on this one. i find that sandpaper will sort of change what grit it acts like the more you use it. a 120 will get duller and start working like a 220 fir a while. so i keep most of my sandpaper around until i gets destroyed. i just sort of feel for a piece that has about the right scratchiness to it for what i want to do. that dosen't really work too well above like 400 because up there it all feels the same to me, but i just tend toward whatever feels like it would work right

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Eesh. Talk about reviving 2.3 year old threads, guys...

(I just buy stuff that's labled, obvious, keep it seperated, chuck it out when it stops doing what I want it to; I don't want dull paper cutting like 'higher grit' paper, I want sharp higher grit paper doing its job properly.)

Edited by Mattia
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The problem with using old paper is that it doesn't actually get finer at all. It gets duller, so it cuts less efficiently (so it cut at the same speed as a finer paper), but it still leaves the same size scratches behind.

So you're doing more work, to get an inferior result - IMO a poor move :D

Fresh paper, toss it as soon as it starts to get dull. I'm afraid my organisational system follows soapbars abrasive orgy model...

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Man, it's totally ironic that this subject was brought back up. I was just putting the final touches on my SandScope© Machine, and have a patent pending right now. Let me further explain what this machine will do for you!!!

- Scans sandpaper and determines the actual grit, even if it's been used before!!!

- Can alter the sandpaper to whatever grit you want. Example: You have a 100grit sandpaper and want 600 grit, run it through the patent pending SandScope© Machine, and VOILA, you now have the desired grit!!

- Will analyze your sandpaper and give you valuable specs on it. Like the following: date it was made, what materials was used to make it, and also, estimated usage time of the sandpaper.

I know it's hard to believe guys, but it's coming sooner than you think!!!

Robert, you are going to order one right? I did devote 2.3 years of my life trying to solve this thread. :D

disclaimer: The above statements are for entertainment value only, and the SandScope© is not real product, but a product of my imagination. Please don't call or email me about this device, unless of course you believe anything you hear, and have a lot of money. haha

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