Jump to content

Best way of squaring sides


Recommended Posts

Alright guys, I have a problem (well most of you know that but this is a guitar problem B) )

I'm trying to square off the sides of my body (Les Paul double cutaway) but I've got limited tools to do it. I have been clamping my orbital sander perpendicular to the work surface and pushing the body against it, not the best or safest way I know.

What is the best way to go about it?

1) Make template and use flush cutting router bit and bearing - I've never done this before and I'm scared :D

2) Buy a drum sander for the bottom of my old mans pillar drill - a bit strapped for cash at the minute though

3) Make a router table (MDF and workmate) and use the flush cutting bit and bearing again

I also want to cut 2 binding channels after (one on the front and one on the back) after the edges are squared off, so I'm thinking option 3. What do you more experienced guys rekon?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Both 1 or 3 work well. I used them on the guitar below. The binding channel for the carved top was cut with an improvised router table (more or less exactly as you describe) and the back with the same bit in a plunge router.

Which ever way you do it be sure to trim very close to the line first, and use a very sharp bit in small increments. The nature of the grain in the waist of the guitar makes it VERY easy get to tear out, and this is nightmarish to repair invisably. Climb cutting can help, but be very carefull not to lose your grip on the router or the guitar, and plan every cut before you make it.

m3840467-9259.jpg

m3840473-9427.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've used the same method that Setch describes alot and have never had a tear out, but I also plunge in very small increments. All 3 methods will work great. Just use the one you are comfortable with and aren't scared of messing up with. If you do use a flush trim router bit, take your time and like he said make sure it's a good bit.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think having a 1/2 inch collet and cutter makes a big difference - I suspect that the extra flexibilty of a 1/4 inch makes it more prone to tearout, especially if you are using a long cutter. I have a long 1/4 bit for body profile routing which is a real bitch for tearing out material, even though it's of good quality and very sharp :D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Setch,

About your guitar in the pic:

Looks like maple, and looks like many pieces. How many ? It looks good, and has my interest, because I have a maple cabinet door that looks like the same amount of pieces glued together. Kinda thought maybe it could be used for a gtr top, but thought it would look silly. Yours certainly doesn't look one bit silly.

*** Actually now that I looked a little harder, it appears to be just 2 pieces, so my question above is pointless :D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yup, it's maple. It's definately not what most folks would characterise as 'instrument quality' maple - not remotely white, but I really like it. It has big mineral streaks (I think) which lend it some stripes of almost grey green - I'm guessing these are what you initially thought were joints of a fourpiece top.

I think a fourpiece top could look very nice, provided the joints were nice and tight. It certainly can't hurt to liberate some nice maple from a cupboard door...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Both 1 or 3 work well.  I used them on the guitar below.  The binding channel for the carved top was cut with an improvised  router table (more or less exactly as you describe) and the back with the same bit in a plunge router.

Which ever way you do it be sure to trim very close to the line first, and use a very sharp bit in small increments.  The nature of the grain in the waist of the guitar makes it VERY easy get to tear out, and this is nightmarish to repair invisably.  Climb cutting can help, but be very carefull not to lose your grip on the router or the guitar, and plan every cut before you make it.

m3840467-9259.jpg

m3840473-9427.jpg

lovely piece of work :D

i use sanding drums of various sizes in my drill press for squaring

dr

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...