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1958 Goya G-10 Restoration


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I'm a newbie when it comes to working on guitars. At 13 yrs old, my step-dad gave me an ovation applause 12 string in 79 to play in his band. Thats been the only guitar i played until my 50's (started playing it again at 50, now 52), but that project will be another thread. I inherited this G-10 from my great aunt and the golpeador on it (white) was peeling off (see the outline). When I removed it (no heating, just a razor), it dug into the finish as shown. One of the tuner pegs was also bent and the neck had both dirt and wear on it. I wound up sanding it down while I evaluated the finishing options. Several folks suggested tru-oil but its unavailable here in CA. Others suggested a wipe-on poly. I wound up using the wipe-on poly as a leveler, sanded down that to minimum, then lacquered the top. Its been about 2 months since i finished it and am wondering it I should even bother with wet-sand/buffing or leave it as is? The finish is smooth but its not glossy hard. I have some clear pickguard material as well that i feel I should use for protection. Thoughts? 

g10-1.jpgg10-2.jpg

 

g10-5.jpg  g10-8.jpgg10-12.jpg

 

 

g10-18.jpg  g10-20.jpg

g10-22.jpg  g-10-f2.jpg

 

Thanks for reading.

 

 

 

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She's a pretty instrument and you've done a nice job in restoring her!

As the lacquer has visible streaks I might be tempted to level and buff it. At least that would provide a flat surface for attaching a golpeador or smaller scratchplate.

It had been decades since I had had a classical so when my daughter bought a semi-wreck I had to relearn how to tie the strings. It's no rocket science but there's a trick or two for the best results.

 

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I'd start with a flat semi-solid block and some wet sandpaper, starting at 600 or so and going through the grits up to 2000 or higher. Sand in one direction only (back and forth allowed) and change the direction by 45 deg every time you go to a finer grit. That way you'll see when all the scratches from the previous sanding have disappeared. Apply just the weight of the block and level the ridges. Only when the surface is level to the desired degree it is time to buff. When using power tools there's always the risk of burning your finish. Don't apply too much pressure, use a fine enough compound and take your time.

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12 hours ago, dougrun said:

she currently is strung again while I decide. had to learn how to tie nylons.

that's the spirit... for me... if I go that far it's over... and I will never go back and touch it up... but that's totally ok - guitar looks great!

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  • 2 weeks later...

Can you wiggle the crack either by pushing from underneath or from the top for a pumping effect? If you can, squeeze some water into the crack with a small brush, followed by Titebond, possibly thinned with water. The water will spread into the dry wood and cause a sucking effect for the Titebond to follow. If you can see squeezeout on the inside you're golden. Use a mirror or a (phone) camera to view the inside.

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  • 2 weeks later...

@dougrun looks nice.

My experience with super glue is similar, it tends to go wide. If you don't have any finer sandpapers, a rubbing compound is the next step. There's several coarseness levels in those as well, after 1500 grit wet I would try a medium coarse compound often referred to as "cleaner" rather than "swirl remover".

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Looks very nice! Knowing where to look it's even less visible than the centerline. That looks like an excellent job on the entire top and I guess a pro would have charged big money for that.

There's some blotchiness on the photo, partially most likely due to the pretty low resolution and partially because of wisely bewaring not to sand through the top. Some sunlight will most likely take care of the lighter spots and even the colour.

 

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